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  • #3194
    EKEK
    Keymaster

    The article below is an extract from the chapter Cosmiculture in the book Secrets of the Soil by Christopher Bird & Peter Tompkins. Secrets of the Soil has introduced hundreds of thousand farmers worldwide to primal mysteries of the soil. Please Enjoy.

    Luckily our Indian heritage is slow to die. In the highland woods of Georgia, within sight of the Great Smoky Mountains, mystic haunt of the Cherokee, it lives on by the Tallulah River into whose turbulent waters the daughter of the chief once threw herself from a thousand-foot cliff to join her young white lover, sacrificed by her understandably segregationist father. A few miles upstream from the lover’s leap, the grandaughter of another Tallulah Cherokee, Sarah Hieronymus, has been tapping cosmic waves. In a labaratory on the shores of Lakemont, not far from the Cherokee reservation, she is carrying on the work of her late husband, T. Galen Hieronymus, running the Advanced Sciences Research and Development Corporation, a nonprofit organization presently devoted to the spread of “Cosmiculture”-the channeling of cosmic energy into the ground for the benefit of plants.

     

    This Steinerian ideal is a accomplished with what Galen called cosmic pipes, ten-foot- plastic polyvinyl-chloride tubes, three inches in diameter, which was raised, like an Egyptian dged column, to a height of eight fee, their bases inserted thirty inches into the ground. Atop each pipe is a copper electrode designed to absorb the mysterious solar energy Galen called eloptic, a combination that obeys “some electrical laws but not all of them, and some optical laws, but not all of them,” and passes it down a wire coiled around a quartz crystal to an underground amplifier, there to be broadcast through the soil for a mile or so in all directions.

    “We don’t make them any higher,” Galen told us in the summer of 1987, a few months before he died, “because the potential increases as you go up: it gets too strong above six or seven feet. All around us is a great sea of energy, cosmic energy, solar energy, lunar energy, planetary energy, and the energy of the earth itself. But, unlike the chemicals sold in commerce, this energy is free, and it isn’t toxic; it’s highly beneficial. All we have to do is tap it: and that’s what we’ve done. When I saw that chemical fertilizers and paten medicines designed for livestock were making paupers of the farmers of this nation, I got out my early experiments in eloptic energy and adapted tem to tap this sea of free energy, and so we devised the cosmic pipe.”

    For many years an engineer in charge of heavy power distribution in Kansas, Galen liked to quote astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell to the effect that there are no unnatural or supernatural phenomena, only very large gaps in our knowledge of what is natural. For the last fifty years Galen has been pioneering in the exploration of what he calls “subltle energies,” energies outside the electromagnetic spectrum, as little understood by orthodox science as are electricity or gravity–the world of energies so lucidly described in the Vedas, in theosophy, and in anthroposophy.

    As early as the 1930s, Galen showed that solar energy could be conducted over wires, and more difficult-he succeeded in obtaining a U.S. patent for an instrument that did it. Shortly after World War II he developed radionic instruments on the basis of the sophisticated work of Dr. Albert Abrams, a natural genius who did his pioneering in San Francisco. Ever resilient, Galen then discovered his eloptic energy. “We need a new kind of dictionary,” he said, “to describe these energies, which are allied to, but are different from those in the electromagnetic spectrum. It’s a subtle cosmic energy. It does not attenuate with distance. We conduct it over wires.”

    With his radionic instrument Galen mysteriously rid the fields of many a Pennsylvania farmer outside Harrisburg of Japanese beetles and of European corn borers, remotely affecting the fields with a photograph placed in his “black box” many miles away. So successful was this method that a U.S. general helped form a company to exploit the invention. But the Pentagon, quickly realizing that the same system might be beamed on soldiers in the field, did the chemical companies a service by remotely tuning Hieronymus out of the business as effectively as he had tuned out the bugs on the farmer’s fields.”

    Fingering one of this cosmic pipes in the laboratory of his Lakemont headquarters, appropriately called Oasis, surrounded by innumerable electronic and radionic instruments, Galen spoke of eloptic energy as if it were a friendly jinn; “It doesn’t like coils. It likes straight lines; but we can manipulate it with coils and make it radiate. And it moves with the speed of light. We proved this when the astronauts were on the far side of the moon back in the sixties. We knew, fifteen minutes before NASA that they’d fired their retro rockets. NASA was out of radio communication but we could plot the astronauts with eloptic energy.

    (to be continued)

     

    Secrets of the Soil is available to buy from Amazon.com

    #3195
    EKEK
    Keymaster

    The most advanced experiment, involving communication with plants, has developed in a remote corner of Northern Scotland.
    Three miles as the raven croaks, from the battlements of Duncan’s Castle at Forres, and just South of the heath…where 3 witches prophesied to Macbeth.
    It is here that an ex-raf squadron leader, (turned hotelkeeper), decided to take up residence with his wife, and three young sons….in the derelect corner of a caravan park on Findhorn Bay.
    It was a rubbish heap of old tin cans, broken bottles, bramble and grose bushes.
    Peter Caddy, (who once walked two thousand miles through the Himalayas), crossing Kashmir, deep into Thibet, has been a follower, since his youth, of a school of “Adepts”, whose object is to bring back beauty and wonder to this planet.
    He was illumined by the dictates of his consciousness, or the “Will” of an all-powerful creative force which was revealed to him by his clairvoyant wife, Eileen, so they made the decision to pull up their roots and move to Findhorn Scotland.
    Accompanying the Caddys was another “sensitive”, Dorothy Maclean, who had left the Canadian Foreign Office, to study “Sufism”.
    For some time the Caddys had been intent upon radically changing their lives….by turning away from mundane occupations, and materialist pursuits, in order to enter upon, what Caddy calls, “a long period of training and preparation”.
    During this time, they planned to surrender everything. This also included all personal volition, to a “being” they call “unlimited power and love”, whose “will” is manifest to them, through the guidance of a deceased Rosicrucian master.
    This master they recognized in the flesh, as Dr. G. A. Sullivan, and in the spirit as “Aureolus”, or (Saint Germain), the master of the seventh ray.

    Findhorn Caravan Park
    To be fair, the place in which the Caddys least expected to settle, was this unsightly, over crowded encampment of Mobile Homes, known as the Findhorn Caravan Park. (For years they had hurried past it, on their way to and from Forres). Now some mysterious force was over-riding their aversion.
    Following what appeared to be a crystal guidance, they wheeled an old caravan onto the site of their new home. It was less than half an acre, in a hollow, not far from the main cluster of trailers.
    A patch of land composed mostly of sand and gravel, (that was constantly swept by gale-force winds), protected only partially by tufts of broom and quitch grass, which kept the sand from blowing away. It was shaded by a belt of spiny fir trees.
    With winter coming, it was a dismal prospect. Following the concept of Monks, who used to build their monasteries by hand, putting love and light into the fabric of the building, with every stone they laid….the Caddys cleaned their rickety trailer, from top to bottom. They polished all the furniture, pouring in vibrations of love….to cancel out negative vibrations, they considered to be inevitable, in structures built by people, interested only in money.
    Cleansing and hand painting the caravan, was a first step toward the creation of their own center of light.

    The Pioneers
    As none of the Findhorn pioneers was employed, and their meager resources would carry them through only one dark and clammy, Scottish winter….they dreamed of springtime…and establishing a garden. To increase the protective shield of light around them, and as a source of healthy nourishment.
    When Easter rolled around, to herald a Renaissance of the land….the arid, lifeless soil surrounding their caravan, seemed hopeless for growing anything edible. Caddy, who had never sown a vegetable seed in his life, felt like Noah….when guided to build an Ark, where there was no water, but he persisted.
    Either guidance was to be followed to the letter, or they might as well return to the world of business. His Rosicrucian masters, had taught him one prime rule of life: “To love where he was, to love whom he was with, and to love what he was doing”.
    His wife Eileen, would rise regularly at midnight, and meditate for several hours. She had read, “that everyone receives his spiritual name, at some point in life, and that only then, can he begin his spiritual work in earnest. In 1953, she had felt the word “elixer”, branded on her forehead, so she adopted the name, and from then on, her guidance was constant.

    The Vision
    In her clairvoyant vision, “Elixer” saw seven cedar wood bungalows , clustered together. In the midst of a splendid garden, all trim and neat. (How this vision was to materialize…..in the constricted squalor of the caravan site, remained a mystery). Yet all were prepared to put their faith in her clairvoyance.
    The prospect of creating a garden, seemed a super-human task. The ground was made of fine, dusty sand and gravel, in which nothing grew, but tough, pointed grass.
    “Elixer” received guidance, that each time you put a spade into the ground, you put in your vibrations. That the right vibrations, acted like a magnet, to draw “like” vibrations.
    Caddy made a 9 foot by 9 foot garden, tilling the grass, upside down, to provide nourishment, as it disintegrated. His problem was to get water to the soil, a far more difficult job, than he imagined. The sand was so fine, the water poured onto it, simply went into globules, like quicksilver. With assiduous patience, by spraying the surface over long periods, with a very fine spray, it was possible to impregnate the soil, sufficiently for it to hold the moisture.
    More stones and gravel had to be raked out. Finally the plot was ready for seeding. He planted lettuce, and watched their lettuce grow into stunted apparitions, attacked by wire worms.

    A Natural Compost Pile
    They did not want to use chemical pesticides. A neighbor chanced to pass by, and informed him of a pile of seasoned “soot”, just outside the entrance to the caravan park, an admiral antidote to wire worms.
    He spread it carefully, and luckily it rained and the soot was washed into the soil. By the end of May, they were eating luscious lettuces and radishes. Chemical fertilizers were toxic to the human body….a compost heap was essential, if they were to grow a greater variety of vegetables.
    Only where to obtain the ingredients?
    A pile of rotting grass, was donated by a neighbor. A nearby farmer, grateful for a rescued sheep, gave him a large load of cow manure. A friend who owned a riding stable, allowed them to follow his horses with a bucket and shovel. A nearby distillery supplied them with free peat dross, and cummings, ( a natural barley germ fertilizer).
    Seaweed they gathered free….at the beach. A bale of hay, dropped from a passing truck, almost at the gate of the park…as if from heaven, served to cover their compost.
    They planted water cress, tomatoes, cucumbers, spinach, parsley, squash, and asparagus. They also planted hedges of blackberries, and rasberries, around their garden. Which began to spread beyond the caravan, till it covered 2 acres of ground.
    Every bit of soil of which had to be manufactured from old turf, and new compost: every square inch, man-handled several times in the process.

    Stunning Results….
    Within 2 months the results were stunning! The neighbors, who, not knowing of the spirit, in which the Caddys, were going about their gardening, could not understand what was happening. Especially when the Caddy’s cabbages and brussel sprouts….were the only ones in the area, to survive a plague of cabbage-root grubs, (which eat away at the roots of the plants), and their harvest of black currants, grew healthily….by the bushel. Whereas the crop largely failed, in the rest of the country.
    The lunches began to consist of salads, with over 20 ingredients: surplus quantities of lettuce, radishes, spinach, and parsley were disposed of, around the country…which was suffering a shortage.
    Their evening meals included 2 or 3 vegetables from the garden, grown without fertilizer, or insecticides….freshly picked and cooked. Stews from garden vegetables…consisted of onions, leeks, garlic, carrots, parsnips, rutabagas, turnips, artichokes, Kohlrabi, celery, squash, potatoes, flavored with all kinds of herbs.
    “Elixer”, let her mind dwell on each ingredient, when making a salad, or stew, her thoughts and feelings were important…..in the continuing cycle of life, she was to appreciate whatever she was doing….whether peeling a carrot, or podding a pea. Of the peelings and garbage, nothing was to be wasted. All was to go back into the compost, and the soil….constantly increasing the living vibrations.
    The only drawback to this life, was that when they were obliged to go into town, or on a short holiday, they found it very difficult to support normal food.

    Preserving the Life Foods
    When midsummer came, they were ready to preserve quantities of rasberries, blackberries, and strawberries. Putting up, altogether a hundred pounds of jam. They pickled 15 pounds of red cabbage, and a large quantity of cucumbers. In a newly built garage, they stored potatoes, carrots, beets, and shelves full of shallots, garlic, and onions.
    During the winter they prepared the Earth, for the following season. They planted more fruits, altogether some 20 species, including apples, pears, plums, cherries, apricots, loganberries, and boysenberries. By May of 1964, the fruit trees and bushes were bursting into bud.

    A Life Experiment
    It began to dawn on them…that there might be some greater underlying purpose behind what was happening. That they must be involved in some mysterious pioneering venture.
    Some larger experiment, in group living….that the garden might be the nucleus of some larger experiment, in new age living.
    A sort of training course in the realization that life is a whole.
    In June 1964, when the county horticultural advisor came to take a sample of the soil, for analysis, (his first comment on arrival was that the soil would require a dressing of at least 2 ounces of sulfate of potash, per square yard).
    Caddy replied that he did not believe in artificial fertilizers….and he was happy using compost, and wood ash. The advisor said that would be totally inadequate.
    Six weeks later, when the advisor returned, bringing the results of the analysis, he acknowledged with some bewilderment, that the analysis had found no deficiencies….in the soil sample. All necessary elements, including rare trace elements, were present.
    By now they were growing 65 different kinds of vegetables, 21 fruits, and over 40 herbs, (both culinary and medicinal).

    Dorothy Maclean
    For some time Dorothy Maclean had also been receiving extraordinary spiritual guidance, of her own. And had adopted the name of “Divina”.
    She realized that by raising the quality of her own vibrations….she might eventually open the doors, to a whole new spiritual realm of plant life.
    It became clear that human thinking, human passion, human anger, human kindliness and affection…all have far-reaching effects on the world of plants.
    (Plants are most susceptible to human thoughts, and emotions…which affect their energy).
    Poisonous and bad-tempered moods, have as depressing effect on plants, as happy uplifting frequencies….have a beneficial effect. It occurred to her, also, that bad effects could come back to humans…as they ate the produce….they had infected, with bad vibrations.
    Thus, the whole cycle could become viciously descending…..leading to more and more misery, pain and disease. Or hopefully ascending…leading to greater joy, and greater light.
    The most important contribution that man can make to a garden…even more important than water and compost…is the radiation he puts into the soil, while cultivating it. Such as love, and every member of a group, has something to contribute, in the way of radiations, strength, happiness, and so on………
    Everything that comes in to a human being, through inspiration of one sort or another, goes out again…modified in wavelength, tone, and timber…by the “will” of the person involved. He or she can improve the quality of what is sent out, and increase the brilliance….of its wavelength.
    At the same time the soil and plants, are constantly being affected by radiations from the earth itself, and from the cosmos…each of which contributes to its fertility…without which both soil and plants, would be sterile;
    These radiations were more fundamental then chemical elements, or microbiotic organisms…radiations that are subject fundamentally to the mind of man.
    Man appeared to have the role of a demi-god. By cooperating with nature, he might find no limit…to what could be achieved on this planet……………

    The Vision of Light
    In the spring of 1967, they extended the garden even further…and made it into a place of beauty, with the planting of many kinds of flowers. The vision they had seen, was now beginning to materialize.
    Money for neat cedar strip bungalows, turned up, as if by miracle, and the bungalows were soon surrounded by impeccable flower gardens.
    In 1968, when Findhorn was visited by a number of accomplished gardners and agricultural experts, they were amazed at what they found. They had never seen such a uniformly high standard in all sections of a garden.
    The growth and color of the flowers in the new herbaceous borders were so remarkable…that the visitors were at a loss to explain the phenomena, considering the poverty of the soil, and the rigorous northern climate.
    The root vegetables were the best they had ever tasted, and they were surprised to find fruit trees of all sorts in blossom, as well as a vigorous young chestnut…standing 8 feet tall, among broad-leaved trees and shrubs thriving on the slope of windswept dunes.
    With and interest in the organic method…they had seen enough to know that compost and straw mulch alone, mixed with poor, and sandy soil, were not enough to account for such a garden.
    There must be some “factor x”, to be taken into consideration.
    If so much could be accomplished at Findhorn, in such a short time…the Sahara could be made to blossom.

    The Devas……..The Nature Spirits
    Lady Cynthia Chance, a follower of Rudolf Steiner’s biodynamic farming methods, was astounded when Peter Caddy told her…he did not need to apply Steiner’s methods, that he had a more direct spiritual way, of obtaining the same results.
    “The vigor, health, and bloom of the plants in the garden, at midwinter…on land which is almost a barren, powdery sand…cannot be explained by the moderate dressings of compost.
    Nor indeed, by the application of any known cultural methods, of organic husbandry. There are other factors…and they are vital ones”.
    At which point, Peter Caddy broke down, and let out the secret of their success, at Findhorn.
    He said that “Dorothy Maclean”, or “Divina”, had managed to get in direct contact with the devas, or angelic creatures…who control the nature spirits.
    That are said by clairvoyants, to be everywhere…at work nurturing plant life.

    Communication with the Devas
    Conscious investigation of such worlds is of the utmost importance, to our understanding of the life of plants. Peter Caddy put out a series of pamphlets, describing the true nature, of the experiments at Findhorn. “Divina” contributed detailed descriptions of the messages she received, directly from the Devas.
    She described whole hierarchies…responsible for every fruit, and vegetable..to every flower and weed.
    A new Pandora’s box opened up.

    New Age Center of Light
    Findhorn quickly developed into a community of over a hundred disciples. Young spiritual leaders turned up, to preach the gospel of the New Age. And a college was founded in the community, to teach the tenets, of this New Age.
    What had started as a miraculous, little garden…appeared to be turning into a true center of light…for the Aquarian Age, visited annually…from every continent of the globe.
    Parting the veil into other worlds, and other vibrations…beyond the limits of the electromagnetic spectrum…may well go a long way to explain the mysteries…..which are incomprehensible physicists who limit their looking…to what they can see with their physical eyes, and their instruments.
    In the more etheral world of the clairvoyants, who claims to have mastered the art of etheric and astral vision…a whole new series of vistas, opens up around plants…..and their relation to man, to the Earth, and to the Cosmos.
    The growth of seeds and plants, as Paracelsus intimated, may indeed be affected very stongly…by the position of the moon, the positions of the planets, and their relation to the sun and to the other stars of the firmament.
    Fechner’s animistic vision of plants being “ensouled”, becomes less of a wild conceit.
    The ancient wisdom, as detailed by seers like: Helen Blavatsky, and Alice Bailey, throws quite another light on the energy of bodies, both of humans and of plants, as well as the relation of individual cells…to the entire cosmos.
    The secret behind Pfeiffer’s biodynamic compost, which has been proved so highly effective, scientifically….turns out to be a homeopathic wonder.
    Based on a fairy-land creation, of Rudolf Steiner’s organic brews…..made by burying cow horns, filled with cow dung, and deer bladders, filled with nettles and camomile leaves. Steiner’s spiritual science, throws such a light on plant life and agriculture, as to make Scientists root in their tracks…………….
    Aesthetically, the world of Devas, and the nature spirits….turns out to be even more full of color, and sound, and perfume, than the creations of Wagner and Mozart.
    Their gnomes, nymphs, and undines…their fire, water, earth and air spirits….closer to reality than the Holy Grail…..and the eternal quest it engendered.
    The attraction of worlds…..within worlds, is too great to forego, and the stakes too high….for they may include survival for the planet.
    Where the modern Scientist, is baffled by the secrets of the life of plants….the seer offers solutions which, however incredible, make more sense…..than the dusty “mouthings” of Academicians.
    What is more….they give philosophical meaning to the totality of life…………….

    #3196
    EKEK
    Keymaster

    These documents were found in the research archives of Christoper Bird

     

    Another Form of Energy is Discovered that has Infinite Possibilities

    A Description of Recent Researches of T. G. Hieronymous

    by

    T. G. Hieronymous
    ( 1956 )

    Introduction

    “Complete theories do not fall from heaven”… Freud.

    This well exemplified the attitude of many people — that if an idea is not completely developed and the theory so foolproof as to be beyond question, then they want no part in it.

    Following Benjamin Franklin’s discovery of electricity, a scoffer caustically asked, “Of what use is that kind of knowledge?”

    To which Franklin kindly replied, “Of what use is a child? He may grow into a man.”

    We are very much in the same position as Franklin. We have discovered a new force or rather we have uncovered a force that has been here since the beginning of time but only a few have recognized it.

    The BIG question is, “What shall we do with it?”

    At the moment, we are doing two things: continuing research and acquainting interested people with the idea in order to get their cooperation. That is the reason for this paper. This is the first time the subject has been discussed publicly before an audience.

    Eloptic Radiation Theory

    There is an all-pervading media that is capable of being set into activity by certain forces. This media might be the same as that which is described by electronic and electrical engineers and physicists as the ether in action at higher harmonics than so far explored, or it may be a finer media. Since it acts as if it were different, let’s call it the FINE MEDIA for descriptive purposes at the moment.

    Our material world is made up of combinations of a few units, some of which are called electrons, protons, and neutrons. These units act as if they were precipitations out of the Fine Media, because these units may be disintegrated or put back into their original state in the Fine Media. There is much in today’s scientific literature that points the way to these conclusions in addition to our own research results. The Fine Media can take on or manifest several different qualities, such as frequency and cohesive force.

    Just as the ether can be caused to vibrate at different bands of frequencies to manifest as electricity, radio, heat, light, ultraviolet, etc., so can the Fine Media be caused to manifest in many ways.

    When the Fine Media is properly influenced, it can be caused to coalesce to the point where material units such as electrons, protons, and neutrons are formed. When these units are desired to be grouped together, a still further manifestation of the Fine Media takes the form of the cohesive force necessary to form the nits into elements such as helium, iron, gold, and uranium. A still further manifestation of the cohesive force is necessary to form elements into compound or complex groups.

    When such units are formed into elements or compounds, there is a stress field, or aura, around or radiating from such elements and complex groups. This field or aura has a frequency that is characteristic for each nuclear and molecular combination.

    For example, chromium having in its nucleus 24 protons and 30 neutrons will have a slightly lower frequency than will iron with 26 protons and 28 neutrons, even though both nuclei contain the same total number of 54 units each.

    This phenomenon is the basis of the idea covered by patents and its use as an analyzing medium, the subject matter of this paper.

    It takes a certain amount of energy to cause the Fine Media to coalesce so that the units, protons and neutrons, will be formed and a lesser amount of energy to combine the units into the group of particles called the element, e.g., hydrogen, silver or mercury, and still a lesser amount of energy to form the molecules of the various compounds.

    Such an element or compound can be disintegrated back into its components or units or even completely back into the Fine Media from whence it came. The atomic bomb action obeys this principle.

    To disintegrate an element and change it back to its units takes energy, the amount depending upon the way the energy is applied. Assume a very heavy weight suspended by a long chain. To cause this weight to oscillate over, e.g., one foot with one blow from a hammer might require a hammer of very large proportion and a giant to wield it.

    On the other hand, if a small boy gave the weight a push, then waited a bit and gave another push and another, all timed properly, the weight would begin to swing andintime would be swinging through the arc of one foot.

    When a single blow in the form of a fast-moving particle, such as a neutron or alpha particle, accelerated in a cyclotron, is the “hammer”, and the nucleus of an element is to be broken up, the “hammer” must strike a tremendous blow (millions of electron volts) to crack the nucleus.

    On the other hand, if a small amount of energy is fed into the nucleus at its proper frequency, the nucleus will easily, slowly, quietly fall apart into its units, just by neutralizing the effect of the cohesive force or binding energy as it is sometimes called. Thus a little energy of proper frequency steadily applied may do more than an enormous amount of energy applied in the brute force manner.

    One of the most used but least controlled and understood methods of setting the Fine Media into oscillation is by the Mental-Emotional output from a human being. Just as the crystal in a radio power oscillator sets the frequency, and the energy applied to the plate circuit determines the power output, so does the Mind act to set the frequency and the Emotional Body to furnish the power.

    Every time we generate an emotion we start a wave motion in the Fine Media. Such a wave motion can travel infinite distances, and it continues to oscillate until some counteracting wave motion is set up to neutralize the original or until the original wave motion is absorbed by someone or something that is in the proper frequency relation to it.

    Just as a radio receiver that is tuned to the exact same frequency as a transmitter acts as if it were connected via some invisible medium to the transmitter by responding exactly as the transmitter is activated, so does a specimen of certain things act as if there were a connection between it and the parent body form which it was taken by responding exactly to all activities of the parent body.

    Substantiation

    At this point, the scoffer usually says, “That’s all bunk!” Suppose we digress a moment and see to whom he directs his verdict of “bunk”.

    Almost 20 years ago, Dr Robert Millikan, former president of the California Institute of Technology and Nobel Prize winner in physics for his work in weighing the electron, was speaking before a joint meeting of all the technical societies of Kansas City, MO. He showed a large number of slides, the last of which was a smooth curve with “f” along the left margin and “e” across the bottom. He said, “Some day we will find that each of the elements of material matter vibrates at a frequency, each different from the other.”

    The writer was thrilled beyond words because some of the material in this paper had at that time already been discovered.

    Years laterm Dr I.I. Rabi of Columbia University won the AAAS prize for his work on nuclear resonance. Quoting from Science News Letter for January 6, 1940, on this work, we read, “Atoms can act like little radio transmitters broadcasting on ultra short waves.”

    The Associated Press release of December 30, 1939, went further and said about Dr Rabi’s findings, “Man himself as well as all kinds of supposedly inert matter constantly emit rays. The existence of such rays coming from man and all living things, and probably from the inanimate, has been suspected by a few scientists for many years. Today brought experimental proof. The discovery shows that every atom and every molecule in nature is a continuous radio frequency broadcasting station. Those who believe in telepathy, second sight and clairvoyance, have in today the first real proof of the existence of invisible rays which really travel from one person to another.”

    Another Associated Press release next day states, “Scientists who have studied Dr Rabi’s report said it furnishes for the first time a logical explanation of such things as telepathy, heretofore a quasi-scientific phenomenon, and the ‘feeling’ that someone else is approaching in a dark room. It may also prove to be the source of attraction or repulsion between individuals since all the atoms of the body are continually broadcasting weak but detectable radio signals.”

    David Sarnoff, president of RCA, speaking before the 7th International Congress on Rheumatic Diseases in New York (June 1, 1949), said, “Men do not understand how their thoughts and emotions are born, and by what power they grow to fruition. Is this force electricity? When we understand each other, is it because we are attuned to each other electrically or electronically? If so, we should learn the electrical characteristics of the human body.”

    On March 7, 1951, the Miami Herald (FL) printed a UP release from Copenhagen, Denmark, Agricultural expert Herluf Hansen said, “Any mental disturbance is immediately reflected in the pig sty. Keep your temper, talk friendly to your pigs, and caress them. The financial result will be excellent.”

    The same paper on march 16, 1950, carries this, “If beautiful blondes run away at your approach, if dogs growl at you without explanation, cheer up, maybe it’s not your face after all. Might be your body vibrations.”

    This is the theory put forward today b y Austrian psychologist Dr Hubert Rochracker, who says, “The human body sends out minute vibrations that, for good or ill, affect all our daily lives.”

    Norman Hillier of New York, speaking at a convention of the National hair Dressers and Cosmetologists Association in Des Moines, IA, said, “A quarrel with her husband will have repercussions in milady’s hair in five minutes.” It reduces the life of a permanent.

    The United Press (July 7, 1949) under a Paris dateline quotes two Frenchmen, Jules Clate and Andre Coatrieux, “Every metal and every person, living or dead, sends out short waves of different length. Personal wavelengths are as individual as fingerprints. Eventually we hope to develop it for diagnosing disease.”

    You are all acquainted with the work of Dr J.B. Rhine of Duke University I extrasensory perception and his study of the mind and the way it can control things. Every doctor has recognized the effect of the emotions upon the physical body. Expression such as “that man gives me a pain” and “this business makes me sick” may be literally true, according to Dr Edward Weiss of Temple University Medical School. “The body has some sort of ‘organ language’ for the outlet of tense emotions, which mimic almost any disease”, said Dr Weiss.

    The work of Dr Felix Bloch and his group at Stanford University and by Dr E. M. Purcell and his group at Harvard, the two groups working independently but simultaneously in 1945, confirmed the work of Dr Rabi and carried it further.

    Anyone who is interested will find that hardly a week goes by without some press article or technical reference that ties in and touches on some phase of this phenomena.

    Eloptic Energy

    A form of energy hitherto unknown has been discovered, and a basic patent has been issued covering its use.

    The name ELOPTIC has been coined and assigned to the energy. The word is taken from the first two letters of electricity and the word optic, because the energy has some, but not all, of the characteristics of both those forms of energy.

    Eloptic energy radiates from or is in some manner given off from, or forms a force field around, everything in our material world under normal conditions at ordinary room temperature and without any treatment of any kind. Each element and combination of elements that make up our material world gives off this energy; however, the energy from each element differs in frequency from the radiation coming from every other element. Thus, we have a means of determining the contents of an unknown material by analyzing the radiations from it without in any way destroying or disturbing the object or material in question, or having to excite it in any manner.

    Eloptic energy obeys certain laws just as does electricity, heat and light, and we have uncovered man, but not all, of these laws and have learned much about the utilization of eloptic energy.

    Just as electricity in its infancy had few uses because little was known about conductors, insulators, and the laws governing the action of the force, so is the use of eloptic energy today limited only by available technology.

    We have barely scratched the surface of the possibilities; however, there are quite a few uses that have been developed and much is already known about the behavior of eloptic energy.

    We have identified the radiations from over one-third of the elements of material matter; the ones easily obtained in relatively pure form such as beryllium, carbon, magnesium, aluminum, iron, copper, zinc, silver, tin, tantalum, platinum, gold, lead, bismuth, etc. Carnotite ore has been analyzed for radium and uranium. Many ore samples have been analyzed to determine the various elements contained in them, and the findings have been verified by more extensive chemical, spectrographic or other analytical methods.

    Combinations of two or more elements give off a characteristic frequency of radiation by which the combination may be identified. For example, hydrocarbons such as benzene and toluene have been analyzed and the findings verified by spectrographic and chemical analysis.

    Each of the tissues of the body give off a characteristic frequency of radiation by which it can be identified and the virility or vitality of the tissue may be determined by noting the intensity of the radiation.

    Each disease entity gives off a characteristic emanation by which its presence in the body and something of its virility may be determined.

    Eloptic energy can be conducted along light rays, focused with lenses, refracted with a prism and its effect implanted upon photographic film.

    An aerial photograph film taken at several hundred thousand feet elevation can be used to determine what was in the objects photographed on the ground, such as people and metals in buildings, cars, etc.

    The apparatus can be set for any elements such as iron, a stylus placed on the spot on the film to be analyzed, the energy implanted on the film can be picked up by the stylus, conducted through the instrument, and if there is the eloptic energy of iron on the film it is evident that there was iron on the ground, radiating the characteristic iron frequency even though not visible to the eye.

    Plants can be analyzed to determine whether the root, stem, or fruit contains the elements necessary for proper nutrition, such as iron, copper, manganese and other trace elements. The plant or fruit can also be analyzed to determine whether it contains arsenic or other poisons from sprays.

    Foods, poisons, drugs, etc., can be checked to determine their effect upon the body or any particular tissue of the body. Those foods or drugs to which a person is allergic and those which are compatible can be quickly identified.

    Just as a photograph can hold the emanation of the object photographed, so can a specimen, an article of clothing, a drop of blood, urine or perspiration carry the emanations of the person from whence it came.

    Such a specimen will carry all the emanations from all parts of the body of the person from whom the blood was taken. Its emanation and those taken directly from the body of the person will be the same. Thus, many of the characteristics of the person from whom the bloodor clothing came can be determined.

    Thus far, only the analytical phase of the utilization of eloptic energy has been discussed, and that only in a very limited way; but it should be evident that eloptic energy has desirable applications in the fields of: (1) Laboratory chemical analysis, (2) Mining, (3) Prospecting, (4) Medicine, (5) Nutrition, (6) Animal husbandry, (7) Horticulture, (8) Military intelligence, (9) Criminology, and (10) General betterment of humanity.

    Naturally, as time goes on and research is continued, many additional uses for eloptic energy will be discovered. We already know that eloptic energy can be generated or picked up from a natural source, filtered, amplified and directed into a tissue of the human body, a plant or animal to produce certain desired effects.

    Refraction

    When the eloptic energy from an unknown material is caused to refract through a proper prism, it behaves in the same manner as energy from the visible portion of the spectrum, except that the angles of refraction are much more acute.

    It must not be inferred that eloptic radiations and visible light and ultraviolet radiations are the same or related because they all may be refracted through the same prism or that the frequencies are related. Eloptic radiations will behave similarly to the radiations of the electromagnetic spectrum in some respects and entirely different in other respects, showing that they are probably not the same energy at all.

    For this reason I prefer to call it the Finer Media.

    A 31.5° glass prism with an index of refraction of 1.505 was used in one experiment (see circular coordinate chart). Eloptic energy from a number of elements was caused to enter the prism at an angle of incidence of 5.5° .

    Using the face of the prism as “0”, carbon (element # 6) refracted at an angle of 18.25° to the face of the prism, and bismuth (element # 83) at 48.25°. Later, hydrogen gas was found to refract at 16.45°, a range of 31.8° for 83° of the elements of the material world.

    Another arrangement employing a 24° prism with an angle of incidence of 17° showed hydrogen approximately 7° from the face of the prism, and bismuth at 62.3°, or a range of 5.3° for the same 83 elements.

    A 19 black plexiglass prism of 1.847 index of refraction with an angle of incidence of 19 allowed bismuth to refract through at approximately 65.7° and carbon at 12.15°. All of the angles were measured with a protractor in a somewhat crude way because of the construction of the apparatus, but they are very close to being correct.

    If a 90° arc is drawn with the center at the point of eloptic energy emergence at the face of the prism, between a line projected out in the direction along the face of the prism, it will be found that all of the radiations are refracted out in this quadrant (see Prism Refractor sketch). If the arc of the quadrant is divided into 1600 parts with “0” on the line extending along the face of the prism and 1600 on the line perpendicular to the face of the prism, then it will be found that with a certain apparatus arrangement, one of the isotopes of beryllium (Atomic # 4) refracts through at approximately 186 on the scale and that bismuth (Atomic # 83) refracts through at 1097 on the scale, and all of the other elements and their various isotopes refract through in their proper relationship, the one having the lowest nuclear weight indicating a higher frequency and a more acute angle of refraction, and the one with a heavier nuclear weight indicating a lower frequency and emerging at a less acute angle. The tests show that eloptic energy obeys some of the laws of refraction just as does the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.

     

    Radiation from the Nuclei of Elements

    A series of experiments has been carried out that points rather conclusively to the assumption that the radiation that comes from the various pure elements is from the entire nucleus and not from the planetary electrons or from either the neutrons or the protons alone.

    The best obtainable pure specimens of the elements Titanium, Vanadium, Chromium, Manganese, Iron and Nickel were used. Tests were run on Radiation Analyzer # 508. Energy peaks from these elements were measured and the prism dial settings for each peak were noted. A study of the number of energy peaks for the various elements indicated that the number coincided in most case with the number of isotopes of the respective elements.

    One important item was that one of the peaks for chromium and one for titanium were very close together; that is, they refracted through the prism at near the same angle. The same for another peak of chromium and one for iron, and another for an iron peak and a nickel peak.

    The number of protons in each of the isotopes was multiplied by their individual mass weight of 1.00758 and the number of neutrons were multiplied by their individual mass weight of 1.00894 and the two products added to get a factor representing the differnce in two isotopes of the same nuclear particles but with a different number of neutrons and protons in each nuclei.

    Thus, titanium with 22 protons and 28 neutrons has a factor of 50.41708, while chromium with 24 protons and 26 neutrons has a factor of 50.41436, a difference of 0.00272, chromium being the lighter, in nuclear weight.

    Titanium = ( 22 x 1.00758 ) + ( 28 x 1.00894 ) = 50.41708
    Chromium = (24 x 1.00758 ) + ( 26 x 1.00894 ) = 50.41436
    Difference = 0.00272

    These factors and the prism dial settings were used to produce the curve shown (Nuclear Weight Factor vs Prism Angle). One outstanding fact noted was that the lighter the factor value, the lower the dial setting or higher the frequency of the emanating energy. Another was the smoothness of the curve. Nearly all points are in proper relationship. Irregularities are probably due to slight variations from a true flat of the prism surface.

    While plotting this curve, it was noted that in a few cases, there were apparently too many energy peaks for some of the elements. Further study revealed that there were radioactive isotopes of the so-called man-made variety that would fit into these spots. It had already been noted that known radioactive elements gave a much more violent radiation than the so-called stable variety. Tests were then made on the various isotopes to determine the distance that the radiation, or rather, the force field, seemed to extend out from the specimen. Vanadium showed that the three isotopes radiated 18.5″, 5.5″, and 15.5″ respectively, indicating that apparently the middle one was the stable one and the other two were radioactive. The same thing was done for Iron and the distances were 16.5″, 8.5″, 17″, 13″ and 10″ respectively. This looked like there might be a discrepancy as there should not be a radioactive isotope at the point of higher degree of radiation. A reference to the percentage of material usually found in the various isotopes showed that the isotope that radiated 17″ was the one that runs about 90.2% prevalence. It could be that some of the iron of this weight was radioactive or there might have been some contamination from manganese which has a radioactive isotope of the same weight.

    After this same procedure had been followed for all the places where there might be a question, and everything seemed to fall into proper place, it was decided to try it on elements at the heavy end of the list. Bismuth showed four isotopes in a row with radiation distances as follows: 13″ for the stable and lightest isotope, and 24.5″, 22″, and 26″, respectively, for the radioactive isotopes. Then a gold link bracelet of very old gold, an heirloom made before the days of so much alloying, was used. The lightest was the stable isotope with a radiation distance of 6″, with two others of 12.75″ and 14.5″ for the two radioactive isotope

     

    Molecular Combinations

    The field of exploration into molecular combinations is too vast to be covered in this paper. In fact, not enough work has been done to warrant such detail.

    The chief chemist of the analytical laboratory of a large corporation learned, through a mutual friend, about some of our work while the patent application was being processed in Washington and were not too anxious to divulge much information, but after several letters we agreed to help him. One of his letters said, “We have recently expanded into a new field of research and some of the problems encountered are giving us a great deal of trouble. Your apparatus may be the answer.”

    We allowed him to bring his specimens to our laboratory and we spent two days with him, most of the time in getting equipment ready for the tests. Finally, we analyzed the contents of four bottles marked A1, A2, A3, A4. We had no idea beforehand what was in them.

    We poured a small quantity of liquid from bottle A1 into a pyrex beaker, placed it in the instrument, and proceeded to “tune in” to all the “broadcasts” that came from the beaker and its contents. Then we did the same for the liquid in bottles A2, A3, and A4. As soon as we had listed the five energy peaks from the empty beaker, six from A1, nine from A2, four from A3and nine from A4, and had charted them with relation to each other, the chemist said, “Now I know my trouble. A1 is a solvent that works fine, A2 is supposed to be the same. Our tests and those of the oil company who sells it to us say it is the same as A1, but it will not work right and is causing us much trouble. It is quite obvious that A2 has been contaminated by A4, which is toluene. A3 is benzene.”

    The three contaminants marked (*) were in both solvent A2 and toluene. The empty beaker contained oxygen and boron, silicon and calcium, per Corning Glass Company and a separate spectrographic analysis.

    He took a copy of our test data back with him, and in about a month he wrote, “We have finished our chemical and spectrographic analyses on the production solvent samples we tested in your laboratory, and I have gone over the data obtained in your laboratory. Toluene has nine characteristic groupings within the molecule, five of these are unique to toluene and four are also found in the benzene molecule. The data from your laboratory is consistent with these facts.”

     

    Progress to Date

    Think of electricity today and then try to picture Ben Franklin with his first “condenser” charged by electricity from a cloud via a kite string. Perhaps some of you remember seeing in museums some of the early day electrical apparatus and how peculiar it appeared. Remember the first crystal detector wireless set you ever saw, and then look at a modern radio installation.

    We are just now learning which materials are conductors and which are insulators of eloptic energy. Our present apparatus is very crude compared with what we expect it to be in a few years with the help of physicists who really want to develop this idea.

    Our present method of detection depends upon the sense of touch of the operator and that requires training, just as a chemist, a radio operator, a good cook, an artist, all require training. Some day we will have learned more about eloptic energy so we can get it to ring a bell, light a light, or actuate a meter. Until then, we will be dependent upon present methods.

    We have been able to impose eloptic energy upon an electric current and amplify it, but since it is not electricity it alone will not operate electrical devices.

    So far we have found nothing that does not lend itself to being analyzed as to its elemental content with the exception of the air around us and those materials of which the apparatus is composed, unless there is a fair quantity available.

    Despite some of the limitations and apparent crudity of the apparatus and techniques sofar developed, it can do things in the laboratory in a few minutes that are absolutely impossible or may take long periods of time by chemical analysis. It can quickly point the way for chemical analysis to follow in order to eliminate many of the time-taking tests when an unknown is to be analyzed. It is especially valuable where there is only a small quantity of the material available. A drop of unknown liquid will work better than a gallon. The material to be analyzed is on no way changed or destroyed during the analysis. Only the emanation normally radiating from it are utilized.

    We are not chemical engineers, physicists or mathematicians, but we have spent over a quarter of a century observing and experimenting, blindly most of the time, to uncover a force or energy or phenomena, about which there had, until recently, been nothing written that we might follow.

    When the US Patent Office issues a basic patent with half a dozen method claims covering the use for analysis of an energy that was not mentioned in any acceptable standard text, it should be quite evident that this is not a wild dream of a disordered mind.


    Unidentified Publication/Author

    The Effect of Magnetism on Eloptic Radiation

    A major problem in prospecting for minerals with the Eloptic Energy Analyzer proved to be precise location. Experiment had demonstrated that the energy from buried metal, etc., spreads around it on a very large irregular pattern, varying in shape and size from day to day and even from hour to hour. It had also been observed on a small scale that this energy can be influenced by magnetism. Therefore it was decided to explore the possibility of using magnets in the field to eliminate or concentrate the diffused energy.

    For this purpose, several ounces of sterling silver were buried about 30 inches deep in a level, open field. The Analyzer was placed nearby and its input was connected to a long insulated copper wire. On the end of this was fastened a test probe.

    To determine how far the energy extended from the buried silver, the probe was driven into the ground successively at various distances along several radii, and readings were taken on the Analyzer. In this way the field of radiation was found, at that time, to form an irregular “pool”, extending not less than 50 feet from the silver and mostly very much farther.

    Now two magnets were made, hollow core solenoids drawing about 10amperes at twelve volts. These were paced on end about 20 feet due east of the silver, and iron rods (5/8″ by 4 ft) were driven through them and about two feet into the ground.

    At first three batteries (18 volts) were connected, and about an hour was allowed for the energy field to adjust itself. Then tests were run as before with the Analyzer, and it was found that the field had shrunk considerably. Following this, two more batteries were attached and additional tests were made. The energy field was now found to have shrunk still farther, and to possess a more simplified outline showing certain definite characteristics. Toward the East it terminated near the magnets, and to the Northwest it exhibited a pronounced bulge of about 15 or 16 ft radius.

    At this point the two magnets and batteries were moved to within 12 ft of the silver and two more batteries were added, making 7 in all (42 volts). Measurements with the Analyzer now showed that the energy pool had completely disappeared as such. There remained only two well defined bands or streams of energy about a foot wide. One of these extended along a straight line connecting the silver and the magnets, and the other thrust out about 8 ft toward the Northeast, then turned and proceeded directly to the magnets. Further tests with the Analyzer showed that the energy drawn to the magnets appeared to dissipate itself above them and over the batteries in a kind of plume.

    This experiment demonstrates that this energy is definitely subject to magnetic attraction. It also shows that the energy exhibits a strong tendency to flow toward the Northwest.


    US Patent # 2,482,773

    Detection of Emanations from Materials & Measurement of the Volumes Thereof
    (Cl. 250-63) Sept. 27, 1940

    Thomas G. Hieronymous

    This invention relates to the art of detecting the presence of and measuring the intensity or quantity of any of the known electrochemical series of elements of material matter, or the combination of two or more such elements, whether in solid, fluid or gaseous forms at ordinary room temperatures and without special treatment or requiring any change in the material under observation.

    The primary aim of this invention is the provision of a method and apparatus for detecting the presence of any element or combination of elements that may be in the substances under observation and to determine the intensity or quantity thereof.

    This invention has for a still further object to provide a method and means for detecting the presence of and analyzing and measuring the quantity or intensity of elements or combinations of elements in the substance under observation through the capture and analysis of radiations emanating from the said elements, whether the said radiations be of electrical or optical characteristics, or both.

    A yet further aim of this invention is to provide an instrument having a reaction device, the surface whereof is affected by the introduction of radiations thereto, in such a manner that the surface of the device will have its ability to resist movement of articles over its face changed when energy flows through the apparatus, of which the reaction device is a part.

    A further aim of the invention is to provide an atomic radiation analyzer, having as one of its important elements, a reaction device, the surface whereof is affected to increase adhesion or friction as the operator of the analyzer strokes the surface of the device and manipulates the instrument to direct radiation thereto.

    It ahs been discovered that there are radiations emanating from or released from each of the known elements constituting material matter. These radiations occur at ordinary room temperatures, i.e., 40° F to 90° F and they have electrical and optical characteristics and frequencies which are disposed in the zone from the violet ray portion of the visible spectrum up into the ultraviolet portion, which zone has as yet not been fully explored. Since it has been found that these radiations from the elements or their effect may be carried over electrical conductors, it is the object of this invention to provide apparatus having suitable conductors and parts so that analyzing of substances may be accomplished. The radiation or the effect of such radiations from known elements or combinations of two or more elements of material matter may not only be carried over electrical conductors and handled in a manner similar to an ordinary electrical currnet, but they may be affected by electrical capacity inductance and resistance. The radiations may also be refracted, focused, diffracted or otherwise manipulated in the same manner as the radiations of the visible spectrum. Accordingly, therefore, this invention has for one of its aims to provide an instrument for handling the radiations, identifying their presence, analyzing them and measuring their intensity — all to the end that the presence of one or more of the known elements may be concluded from the character of the radiation as determined by the behavior of the analyzing device and the values read from the appropriate scales forming a part of the instrument.

    Other objects of the invention will appear during the course of the following specifications, referring to the accompanying drawing, wherein:

     

     

     

    Prior to referring specifically to the parts of the apparatus diagrammatically illustrated in the drawing, clarification of the theory upon which the invention is predicated will be made by explaining experiments heretofore conducted and capable of proving the phenomenal theories hereinafter disclosed as having a bearing upon the practicability and utility of both the electrical and optical apparatus.

    Radiations from each of the known elements of matter produce some form of energy, probably electrons which can be made to flow along electrical conductors. The flow from each of the elements having characteristics different from the others. Conversely, the flow of electrons along a conductor produces a radiation having characteristics of the radiation from each respective element.

    Such of the known elements as are required to feed growing plants have been transmitted to the plants through metallic conductors as the plants were entirely isolated from the elements upon which they were fed. More precisely, seeds were planted in boxes in a darkened basement room. One of the boxes of plants of plants containing some of the seeds was used as a control and no apparatus for transmitting element radiations thereto provided. The remaining boxes of plants had electrodes or plates of conducting material mounted or otherwise disposed adjacent thereto, and each box of plants was separately attached to a conductor extending to a plant outside the building where electrodes or plates were attached to a conductor extending to a point outside the building where electrodes or plates were attached to the conductors and allowed to remain exposed to the light. Such of the known elements as required to impart normal characteristics to the plants were apparently fed thereto by having the radiations of the elements from the light conducted to the plants through the wires and associated electrodes. The treated plants were relatively healthy but the control plants assumed the characteristics of growing vegetation which has been deprived of the elements in natural light. Particularly was the control plant devoid of chlorophyll while the remaining plants were green.

    Apparatus for laboratory or commercial use and for detecting the presence of any of the known elements, preferably relies upon the element of touch, and therefore the skill of the operator. The instrument diagrammatically illustrated in Figure 1 comprises a unit 10 including a coil 12 disposed to pick up radiation from substance 14, wherein the known elements are disposed and that are to be detected. The temperature of substance 14 may be within the range of from 40° to 90° F, but such temperature is not critical. This range has been found satisfactory in actual practice.

    Coil 12 may be a spirally wound flat body approximately 2 inches in diameter and formed of magnet insulated wire of any conventional size. As an alternative, this coil 12 may be a single layer, cylindrical coil, wound on an insulating material substantially 1 inch in diameter. The examples given for this coil 12 are not critical and so long as the coil is in the field of radiation of substance 14, the purpose of unit 10 will be fulfilled.

    Instead of employing coil 12, wire 20 may be directly connected to substance 14 or wire 20 may be terminated in an electrode and the latter disposed with relation to substance 14 as to pick up the radiations therefrom, as does coil 12 in the illustrated embodiment. In this case, wire 18 may be grounded or connected separately to substance 14 or terminated in another electrode which may also be placed near substance 14. The proximity of substance 14 to coil 12 or the electrodes as the case may be, is such as to be within the field of radiation of the emanations from substance 14.

    Apparatus 16 is a manually manipulatable analyzer tuneable to the specific radiation desired. It consists of two principal parts, the first being the two standard type of variable condensers, 22 and 24, and the second being the ray refracting device made up of electrode 32 — passageway 36, prism 28, and electrode 38, all as shown in Figure 2. Apparatus 16 is joined to unit 10 by conductors 18 and 20 across which is disposed a conventional variable condenser 22 and with which is employed a condenser of similar type 24, located in conductor 26, as illustrated. Variable condensers 22 and 24 may be of standard radio broadcast type and they are provided with graduated scales in conventional manner.

    Prism 28 is of any suitable ray defracting substance as glass, quartz or analogous materials. In practice a prism 28 having two polished faces disposed at angles from 30 to 60 degrees has proved satisfactory. An electrode 32 is joined to coil 12 by conductor 20 and conductor 34. Stationary electrode 32 may be of any electrical conducting material such as aluminum, brass, copper or substances having analogous electrical properties. The distance of electrode 32 from prism 28 is not critical so long as the radiations or emanations reach prism 28 through a confined path of travel in the nature of a thin band or line. In practice, this distance was from one-half to two inches. A passageway 36 formed between a pair of optically opaque insulating elements directs the radiations to a desired area on one face of prism 28.

    The angle of incidence of this path of travel to the face of the prism 28 was of the order of 5.5 degrees for best results and for obtaining the wisest useful segment along scale 31.

    An electrode 38 shiftable along scale 31 is joined to unit 40 by conductor 42. Electrode 38 is of the same specifications as to materials and distance from prism 28 as electrode 32 but is suitably mounted for movement adjacent to scale 31 where its position may readily be indicated by a pointer 78 moveable therewith and extending outwardly therefrom toward scale 31 in alignment with the path of travel of the thin ray of energy indicated by the line 76. The axis of rotation of electrode 38 is substantially on a median line extending longitudinally across the face of prism 28 proximal to electrode 38. Electrodes 32 and 38 work best when they are relatively thin and of the order of a few mils thickness.

    As illustrated in Figure 2, scale 31 is calibrated with indicia 44, and these indicia are on chart 46 along one edge thereof. The indicia on chart 46 have been given a corresponding reference numeral to those on scale 31 for clarifying the description hereinafter set down. Indicia 48 on chart 46 designate the atomic weight of elements of matter and continue up to include all known elements of the electrochemical series when the full size chart is employed.

    Unit 40 is a variable resistor. It may be either a continuous variable type or it may consist of a series of non-inductive resistance units 50, 52, 54 and 56, each adjusted by a switch having movable points 62, 64, 66 and 68 respectively.

    In practice, unit 50 will have ten times the resistance of unit 52, which in turn is ten times the size of unit 54, etc. (The values may range from fractions of 1 ohm up to several megohms). Unit 50, e.g., might be 1 megohm in steps of 100,000 ohms each; unit 52 would then be 100,000 in steps of 10,000 ohms each; unit 54 then would be 10,000 ohms total in steps of 1,000 ohms each, and so on until the smallest unit would have steps low enough to give the desired exactness to the measured volume or intensity of the radiations.

    Unit 40 is joined to unit 70 by means of an untuned radio frequency type transformer 58 through the medium of conductors 42 and 60. Unit 40 may be joined to unit 78 by resistance coupling or other conventional coupling of the type frequently used in standard broadcast radio receivers and which is analogous to transformer 58.

    Unit 70 may be a conventional three stage tuned radio frequency broadcast band type of amplifier with the usual variable resistances omitted or it may be of the resistance coupled or impedance coupled type often used in radio broadcast type amplifiers. Said amplifier intensifies the value of the radiations reaching it so that the effect upon detector 72 is clearly discernable. Under some conditions, the reactions from unit 40 may be put directly into detector 72 without interposing unit 70 but amplification of the radiations is desirable.

    Detector 72 is a device that will indicate a change from its normal state when the radiations from the analyzer 16 are caused to influence it.

    Detector 72 is preferably an electrical conductor coated with a material having such characteristics that under the influence of energy flowing through the conducting portion, the coating will change its surface tension or viscosity, or in some manner give evidence of the presence of the energy flowing through the conducting portion by producing a greater drag or resistance to the movement of any part of the body of the operator thereover, such as the hand or fingers. It has been found practical to use a metal plate covered with a sheet of plastic or coated with lacquer, which plate is of an area convenient for stroking with the tips of the fingers or the palm of the hand. It may also be a sheet or plastic with a coil similar to coil 12 disposed adjacent thereto and connected to the coupling transformer 14.

    Figure 4 illustrates another form of that part of unit 16, sowing Figure 2, so far as the element separator or filter portion thereof is concerned. This separation or filtering is accomplished in the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1 and Figure 2 by prism 28. In Figure 4 a lens 100 has the electrode 32 disposed adjacent thereto and movable electrode 38 is shiftable toward and from lens 100.

    Scale indicia 44 are disposed in a line parallel to the path of travel of electrode 38 and the element or elements involved will be determined by the location or the scale of pointer 78 at the instant a reaction is obtained at detector 72.

    Chart 46 is of course produced as a part of the complete apparatus when such apparatus is manufactured and after prism 28 (or lens 100, as the case may be) is installed as a unit of the material detector. A small quantity of each of the known chemical elements is placed adjacent to coil 12 and with full knowledge of the element, the angle of radiation formed by line 76 and, the face of the prism 28, is determined and the degree numeral on scale 31, which identifies the angle of radiation, is placed on chart 46 as one of the indicia 44 (degree readings from scale 31) and indicia 48 (the atomic weight of the known elements) then when the apparatus is in practical use, any material or substance may be located adjacent to coil 12 and its components definitely determined by positioning electrode 38 on a line of radiation 76 where the degree number on the face of the scale 31 is quickly read and used by referring to chart 46. When the degree indicia 44 is so located, the line on chart 46 extending therefrom is followed until it reaches the diagonal line 45 on chart 46 whereupon the operator then follows the intersecting line to the lower edge of the chart where the value of the atomic weight 48 is read. These atomic weights are well known and are used in conventional texts and scientific works.

    In practice, for example, let it be assumed that substance 14 contains calcium but it is not known that such is the case. The angle at which the unknown ray or radiation leaves prism 28 will teach its name form as the operator moves the fingers over the surface of detector 72, electrode 38 is shifted slowly and pointer 78 moves along scale 31 until a greater degree of adhesion or resistance to motion at the surface of the detector 72 is set up. This occurs when the energy or radiation flows from unit 16 through units 40 and 70 into detector 72. When electrode 38 is at a position where it is intercepting a radiation from prism 28, or lense 100, the resistance to stroke at detector 72 will be of highest order.

    As soon as electrode 38 has been positioned as described, variable condenser 22 is adjusted while the operator continues to stroke detector 72 to a position where the greatest drag at detector 72 is again manifested. Next, variable condenser 24 is similarly manipulated to obtain a setting where the drag at detector 72 again reaches a maximum. Electrode 38 is then readjusted for a final position. The employment of condensers 22 and 24 insure a more accurate setting of pointer 78 by virtue of their additional filtering action.

    In the illustration, electrode 38 has intercepted the path of radiation with pointer 78 at the numeral 30 on scale 31 and reference to chart 46 will teach the operator that the element having atomic weight 79.2 is that from which the radiation along dotted line 76 is traveling. If atomic weight 79.2 is calcium then that element in substance 14 has been located.

    The manner of using lense 100 is substantially the same as described in connection with the use of prism 28. The focal point of paths of radiation of the elements will cause detector 72 to react and establish a drag to the operator’s touch, whereupon the scale 31 may be read and its reading translated by reference to chart 46.

    What actually happens at detector 72 to increase or decrease it drag to the touch of the operator, is not known but the apparatus functions as above set forth when constructed as specified, and therefore, a positively acting analyzer for atomic radiations is produced even though the principle upon which it is based is not fully known.

    Radiation from hydrogen passes through prism 26 at the sharpest angle or at the lowest degree measured from the face of prism 28. Radiations from other elements and their isotopes pass through prism 28 at greater angles but in the same order as their atomic weights — the heavier the element or its isotope, the wider the angle.

    A substance composed of two or more of the known elements may be analyzed as herein set down to determine its component constituents. The substance itself which consists of two or more known elements may be identified because the emanations therefrom will produce a composite frequency peculiar to that combination of elements. All combinations may be charted in precisely the same manner as herein described for all the individual known elements in the electrochemical series.

    Unit 40 is used to measure the intensity of the radiations from a given element or substance by adjusting the several switches comprising unit 40 until the maximum amount of resistance has been introduced into the circuit without interrupting the reactions manifested at detector 72. The switches are calibrated in conventional resistance values and a chart must be prepared that will relate the value indicating by switch setting of unit 40 the quantitative units of measurement.

    It is realized that apparatus for detecting materials and measuring the volumes thereof, having physical characteristics different from those illustrated and described, might be made without departing from the spirit of the invention or scope of the appended claims.

    Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is: [Claims not included here

    “Conducting Chlorophyll Energy over Wires”
    by Dr. T. Galen Hieronymous

    About 1930, I decided to try an experiment of conducting Chlorophyll Energy over wires. I had been conducting Eloptic Energy over long distance via wire.

    A wood platform was installed on the south side of the house about six feet above the ground in order to get the desired potential of energy which increases with distance above the ground.

    Having some wooden cigar boxes available, I cut boxes apart and cut pieces and made eight boxes that were 2″ X 2″ X 4″ although any size boxes will work.

    Aluminum foil was placed on the bottom of seven boxes inside so as to be in contact with the soil.

    Similar pieces of foil were placed on the underside of the lid of each box.

    Wires were connected to each piece of foil, the wires from the lids were extended to the sun plates, the wires from the bottom foils were connected to the water pipe and thus grounded.

    #3197
    EKEK
    Keymaster

     

    What Has Become of the Rife Microscope?

    Written by Christopher Bird

     

    New Age, March 1976

     

    Did Royal Raymond Rife find a bacterial agent associated with cancer?

     

    Did this inventor discover a means of electromagnetically curing cancer?

     

    Has one clique of scientists been able to suppress truth for half a century?

     

     

     

    This article, like an embryo or any living thing, is still growing. A continuation of this growth may depend upon the assistance of NAJ readers, their colleagues and their friends.

     

    Originally I intended to write a short note on what was known about the Rife microscope. Precious little is in print on the subject.

     

    One day, while waiting for some material to come up from the cellar-stacks of the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland, considerably frustrated by the lack of leads and data concerning the demise of the Rife microscope, I wandered by the Subject Card Catalogue and casually flipped at random to a card in the middle of a drawer labeled “Microscopes.”

     

    The card was filed under ” Allied Industries,” as if that firm were the author. The company’s address was stated to be 4246 Pepper Drive, San Diego, California. The title referenced was “History of the Development of a Successful Treatment for Cancer and Other Virus, Bacteria and Fungi.”

     

    At the bottom of the card was a single line: “Written by Dr. R.R. Rife.”

     

    Entirely by accident I had stumbled upon what looked to be only one of a series of reports written by Royal Raymond Rife. Fourteen pages long, it was numbered Dev-1042. It was approved and signed by J.F. Crane, Manager; Don Tully, Development Associate; and Verne Thompson, Chief Electrical Engineer.

     

    Are any of these gentlemen alive today?

     

    Was Allied Industries a research corporation established by Rife?

     

    How many other reports did it publish and where are they?

     

    The report so riveted my attention that I was compelled to explore some of the history of microbiology and its connection to cancer and other disease. The present article, much longer than originally planned, is thus the result of a fortuitous finding — perhaps an example of what Jung has called “synchronicity” — and the consequent preliminary exploration.

     

    Much more needs to be done to tell the story of Rife and his microscope, a fascinating episode in the history of science.

     

    The Microscope of Microscopes

     

    In February 1944 the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia published an article, “The New Microscopes,” in its prestigious journal devoted to applied science. Founded in 1824 by “philosopher-mechanics,” the institute, which recently made studies in its physics laboratory on the way to move the Liberty Bell to its new Bicentennial Year location, is a smaller analog of the huge world-famous Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. which reprinted the same article in its own journal shortly after its first appearance.

     

    Authored by R.E. Seidel, M.D., a Philadelphia physician and his research assistant, M. Elizabeth Winter, the essay opened with a six-page discussion of the electron microscope, which had only recently been put on the market by the Radio Corporation of America.

     

    This microscope is today standard equipment in modern laboratories.

     

    The article closed with a ten-page treatment of a “Universal Microscope,” the brainchild of a San Diego autodidact, Royal Raymond Rife, who developed it with the financial assistance of the roller-bearing and axle magnate Henry H. Timken, for whose family Rife at one time served as handyman and chauffeur.

     

    Rife’s scope, the largest model of which consisted of 5,682 parts and required a large bench to accommodate it, overcame the greatest disadvantage of the electron microscope, its inability — because tiny living organisms put in it are vacuum and subject to protoplasmic changes induced by a virtual hail-storm of electrons — to reveal specimens in their natural living state.

     

    With his invention Rife was able to look at living organisms. What he saw convinced him that germs could be not the cause, but the result of disease; that, depending on its state, the body could convert a harmless bacterium into a lethal pathogen; that such pathogens could be instantly killed, each by a specific frequency of light; and that cells, regarded as the irreducible building-blocks of living matter, are actually composed of smaller cells, themselves made up of even smaller cells, this process continuing with higher and higher magnification in a sixteen-step, stage-by-stage journey into the micro-beyond.

     

    Though with the aid of Rife’s device, thousands of still pictures and hundreds of feet of movie film were made to reveal these facts, all of this material and the Rife microscopes seem to have disappeared without a trace.

     

    Or have they?

     

    Calls to the U.S. Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Medical Museum, which has hundreds of different microscopes in its historical collection, to the National Library of Medicine’s Historical Division, to the Smithsonian Institution and the Franklin Institute, both repositories for outstanding scientific inventions, and to a dozen establishments dealing daily in microscopy elicited from curators, medical pathologists, physicians and other scientific specialists only the complaint that none of them had ever heard of Royal Raymond Rife and his microscope.

    Royal Rife_0

     

    What has become of the Rife microscope?

     

    The question is not rhetorical. For if even half of the possibilities described for this astounding discovery are true, a massive effort to hunt it down and reactivate its potential might not only save billions of dollars in biological and medical research but open a fascinating new vista onto the natural of life.

     

    From the start, Rife’s main goal was to find cures for diseases, especially the most intractable of all diseases, cancer. Because he had a hunch that some as yet undiscovered micro-organism would prove to play a crucial role in the onset of this malignancy, he tried unsuccessfully to find one by observing all types of malignant tissue with a variety of standard research microscopes.

     

    In the 1920’s it became obvious to Rife that a better means of scrutinizing the micro-world than had been developed was indispensable. During that decade he designed and built five microscopes with a range from 5,000 to 50,000 diameters at a time when the best laboratory microscopes in use could achieve not more than 2,000 diameters of magnification.

     

    At the Rife Research Laboratory on Point Loma, California, he worked at magnifications of 17,000 and higher, to reveal a host of cells and micro-organisms never before seen and to photograph them. The work required a saint’s patience. It could take the best part of a day to bring a single target specimen into focus.

     

    The Rife microscope has several arresting features. Its entire optical system of fourteen lenses and prisms, as well as an illuminating unit, were made of crystal quartz which is transparent to ultraviolet radiation. In the scope, light was bent and polarized in such a way that a specimen could be illuminated by extremely narrow parts of the whole spectrum, one part at a time, and even by a single frequency of light.

     

    Rife maintained that he could thus select specific frequency, or frequencies, of light which coordinated and resonated which a specimen’s chemical constituents so that a given specimen would emit its own light of a characteristic and unique color. Specimens could be easily identified, thus solving one of microscopy’s greatest bugaboos. It was control of illumination which turned the trick.

     

    Another feature was the microscope’s extraordinary resolution, its ability to reveal the most minute of component parts of any specimen so that each may be seen distinctly and separately from the others. Imagine two extremely thin parallel lines. When they can be clearly distinguished you are still within the microscope’s range of resolution. If the parallel lines blur together, high magnification will only enlarge the distortion and limit of resolution has been attained. With a resolving power of 31,000 diameters — as against 2,000 to 2,500 for the laboratory microscopes in common use in that day — Rife’s device could focus clearly on five lines of a standardized grid whereas an ordinary microscope could do no better than examine fifty lines, and that with considerable aberration.

     

    This is somewhat equivalent to one aerial camera’s being able to spot individual houses in city blocks from a very great height while another is able only fuzzily to distinguish the single city blocks themselves.

     

    Controversial Discoveries

     

    Beginning in the 1920’s and continuing over seven years, Rife and his colleagues worked on more than 20,000 laboratory cultures of cancer obtained from the Paradise Valley Sanitarium in National City, California, in what appeared at first to be a fruitless effort to isolate micro-organisms which he felt should somehow be associated with the disease.

     

    Up to then bacteria had clearly been proved to be linked with a wide variety of ills including tuberculosis, leprosy, cholera, gonorrhea, syphilis, thyroid, bubonic plague, pneumonia and others. But no one had found them in association with cancer.

     

    In contrast to the much smaller viruses, bacteria were widely considered to be unicellular, monomorphic — meaning one shape and one shape only — forms. A quarter of a million of them can occupy a space no larger than the period at the end of this sentence. They come in various shapes. Cocci are round, bacilli rod-like, to offer but two examples.

     

    There are various forms for each shape. Of the round-shaped ones, monococci appear singly, diplococci come in pairs, staphylococci in clusters resembling a bunch of grapes, streptococci, which under certain conditions can produce a painful sore throat in chains.

     

    While outside a host, or body, bacteria are hard to raise, or culture. Each type has been studied as a pure culture only by isolating it upon a specific nutrient, called media.

     

    Bacteria also have specific maximum, minimum, and optimum temperatures at which they will live and multiply. Some, like polar bears, are addicted to arctic temperatures and even live in ice. Others prefer water so hot it would kill most animals. A great many enjoy the temperature of the human body. Millions of them are living, harmlessly, inside you right now.

     

    But they are not always harmless. They can acquire virulence, or the power to cause disease under some conditions but not others, although even today no one knows exactly why.

     

    This mystery, in the 1920’s, was closely connected to a debate in microbiology so hot as to seem almost like a war. On one side were those who affirmed — as do many textbooks today — that bacteria were eternally monomorphic. They could not assume other or smaller forms, as small, say, as a virus.

     

    Originally, virus — the word means “poison” in Latin — was the name generally applied to any microscopic agent injurious to living cells. Now it is much more narrowly defined as “one of a unique group of very small infectious agents that grow only in cells of animals (including humans), plants and also bacteria.”

     

    Because they were so small, viruses would pass through filters which did not allow the passage of bacteria, said to be monomorphic, just as a net of small enough mesh will allow minnows to pass through it but bring the fish that are preying upon them up short.

     

    It is this filter-passing ability of viruses which is widely held today — along with their inability to grow on artificial media — to be one of the main criteria separating them from bacteria.

     

    For several decades, however, another school of microbiologists maintained that, far from holding everlastingly to one shape, bacteria were pleomorphic, or form-changing. They could be caused, under the right conditions of culture, to metamorphize into forms small enough to pass through filters just like viruses.

     

    Because of their sharp disagreement on the filtrability of bacteria, the two camps came to be called “filtrationist” and “non-filtrationist.”

     

    One of the earliest of the filtrationists was a Swedish physician and explorer, Ernst Bernhard Almquist, for whom islands off the north Siberian coast are named. Almquist made hundreds of observations of plemorphic bacteria in his laboratory as did researchers in Italy, Russia, France, Germany and the United States. In 1922, after two decades of work, Almquist came to the conclusion that “nobody can pretend to know the complete life cycle and all the varieties of even a single bacterial species. It would be an assumption to think so.”

     

    Way back in 1914, the American bacteriologist, Dr. Edward C. Rosenow, had the gall to assert that bacteria were not unalterable and that various strains, or what one might call sub-sub-species of them, could, when suitably treated, become any of the other strains. It was Rosenow’s contention, too, that he found a form of the streptococcus bacterium which caused poliomyelitis, commonly know as infantile paralysis.

     

    What Rife’s opinions were about this heated controversy are not known. He followed the standard bacteriological practice of the day, first implanting small patches of cancer tissues on various nutritive media including a special “K” medium developed by another filtrationist, Dr. Arthur Isaac Kendall, at the Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. The medium which bore the first letter of Kendall’s name, seemed to have the faculty of transforming bacteria into transitional forms alleged for them by the filtrationist school.

     

    No matter how often he changed menus for his sought-after cancer microbe, no matter how he altered the temperature of incubation, Rife seemed unable to coax it to appear in his cultures.

     

    It was apparently only when, as a result of his continuing physical experimentation with the effects of light frequencies, he discovered that many microbes respond to the effects of light from noble gases, such as neon, xenon and argon, by changing their growth patterns that Rife hit upon a solution to the problem that was nagging him.

     

    He placed a sealed test-tube containing cancer tissue into a closed loop filled with argon gas. After creating a vacuum within the loop, he charged the gas with electricity, just as one does when one throws the switch to light up the neon lamps in modern offices, though in Rife’s case the charge was 5000 volts. While he still could not reveal any microbes, he noted a certain cloudiness in nutritive medium which, through chemical analysis, he ascribed to ionization caused by the electronic bombardment.

     

    Readers may well wonder why he adopted so strange and novel a process. The question is just as unanswerable as if put about Rife’s next step: in order, he said, to counter the ionization, he placed the tube into a two-inch water vacuum and heated it for twenty-four hours at near body temperature.

     

    Under his microscope, at 20,000X, the tube now teemed with animated forms measuring only 1/20 by 1/15 of a micron — much smaller than any known bacteria. They refracted a purplish-red color in the specific light beam.

     

    He called this form Bacillus X and, later, because it was so much smaller than other bacilli, and perhaps because of the filtrability controversy, BX virus. This problem of nomenclature can be resolved herein by referring to Rife’s organism as a BX for, or simply BX.

     

    Rife writes ” this method of ionization and oxidation brought the chemical refraction of BX out of the ultraviolet and into the visible band of the spectrum. Owing to the fact that the test-tube specimens had gone through so many trials, we again started from scratch and repeated this method 104 consecutive times with identical results.”

     

    Because he could culture his BX form, so small it would pass through any filter, he seemed to have discovered a filtrable form of a bacterium. But just finding bacteria, even in filtrable form, in a human tumor does not necessarily imply that they are its cause. To make sure, it is held they must be reinjected into animals and seen to cause the same or nearly similar disease, after which they must then be reisolated and shown to resemble the original organism. These were the postulates propounded by the German pioneer bacteriologist, Robert Koch, who proved that tuberculosis was apparently caused by the tubercule bacillus.

     

    Following this accepted procedure, Rife inoculated the new BX forms into over 400 rats in all of which there subsequently appeared “tumors with all the true pathology of neoplastic tissue.” Some of the tumors became so large they exceeded the total weight of the individual rats in which they were developing. When the tumors were surgically removed, the BX form was recovered from them in all cases. Koch’s postulates were fulfilled.

     

    More Startling Discoveries

     

    By continued microscopical study and repeated photography to stop their motion, Rife and his co-workers next came to the baffling conclusion that the BX, far from remaining always what he had seen as the purplish-red bodies a fraction of a micron in dimension, could change into not just fairly similar forms as Rosenow had previously discovered, but into completely different forms simply by altering the medium on which they were living only very slightly.

     

    “Slightly” in Rife’s case meant an alteration in the nutrient environment of only two parts per million by volume. Those who would consider this unlikely may recall that in homeopathic medicine doses of remedies are given in dilutions of this weakness and beyond. Even though they have nothing chemically analyzable in them, they are effective.

     

    One such alteration caused the BX to become what Rife called a Bacillus Y, or BY. It was still the same purplish-red color as the BX by so enlarged that it would not pass through a filter.

     

    With the second change of the medium, the BY enlarged still further into a monococcoid or single disk form which, when properly stained, could be viewed under a standard research microscope. Rife claimed that these forms could be found in the blood of over 90% of cancer victims.

     

    By removing this form from the fluid medium it inhabited and depositing it onto a hard base of asparagus or tomato agar, Rife then saw it miraculously develop into a fungus, making it kin to a yeast, mold or mushroom.

     

    Any of these succeeding forms, Rife stated, could be changed back within thirty-six hours into a BX form capable of producing cancer tumors in experimental animals from which, in turn, the same BX form could again be recovered.

     

    The transformation did not stop with the fungus which, if allowed to stand dormantly as a stock culture for a year and then replanted onto the asparagus medium, would then change into bacillus coli, millions of which live in the human intestine. This common bacillus could pass, in Rife’s words, “any known laboratory method of analysis.”

     

    Because he had found that micro-organisms had the ability to luminate when stimulated by given frequencies of light it occurred to Rife that they might also be devitalized by beaming radiations of specific frequencies upon them. One source has it that the harmonics of these frequencies ranged from ten meters to twenty thousand meters.

     

    To this end, he had been developing concurrently with his microscopic equipment a special frequency emitter which he continued to improve, up to at least 1953, as steady advances in electronics continued. The killing waves were projected through a tube filled with helium gas and said to be efficient in destroying micro–organisms at a distance of as much as one thousand feet.

     

    With this device he noted that while the proper mortal oscillatory rate was reached, many lethal organisms such as those of tuberculosis, typhoid, leprosy, hoof-and-mouth disease and others appeared to disintegrate or “blow up” in the field of his microscope. This “death ray” principle was also effective when applied to cultured BX.

     

    The obvious next step was to determine whether similar radiation would affect the BX, not in culture, but in the bodies of cancer-afflicted animals. It apparently did so, for Rife states he got rid of BX in over 400 experimental rats and other animals in his lab. If it worked on animal cancers, wondered Rife, why not on human cancers?

     

    The answer was so resoundingly yes that, in our day when billions are being spent each year to find a cure for cancer, it is prudent to quote Rife’s report word for word: “The first clinical work on cancer was completed under the supervision of Milbank Johnson, M.D., which was set up under a special medical Research Committee of the University of Southern California. Sixteen cases were treated at the clinic for many types of malignancy. After three months, fourteen of these so-called hopeless cases were signed off as clinically cured by a staff of five medical doctors and Alvin G. Foord, M.D., pathologist for the group. The treatments consisted of three minutes duration using the frequency instrument which was set on the mortal oscillatory rate for BX, or cancer, at three-day intervals. It was found that the elapsed time between treatments attains better results than cases treated daily.”

     

    The News Leaks Out

     

    News of Rife’s work began to leak out to the world of medicine at the end of the 1920’s. One of the first to learn of it was Arthur W. Yale, M.D., who lived in San Diego, not far from Rife’s laboratory. He acquired a frequency emitter and began to treat cancerous patients.

     

    In 1940, reporting to his fellow physicians on some of his decade-long results, he wrote that because the whole of Rife’s extraordinary findings constituted an “entirely new theory of the origin and cause of cancer, and the treatment and results have been so unique and unbelievable,” he was making his findings available in the hope that “after further research we may eliminate the second largest cause of deaths in the United States.”

     

    Yale had had limited success in treating cancerous tumors with X-rays and with the use of what he called “static wave current” for some three decades. When he began to use Rife’s device, he sometimes employed it alone, sometimes together, with the two methods with which he was familiar. Both methods brought startlingly successful results. Yale was careful to note that, when he added the use of the Rife ray to his other radiation, cancerous masses “have disappeared in about one-tenth the time and so far with no reoccurrences.”

     

    Dr. Arthur Isaac Kendall, whose “K” medium Rife had used in his experimentation, was also determined to check whether viable bacteria in the filterable state could be unequivocally seen by Rife’s microscope. Kendall had been working with cultures of typhoid bacillus and, under a standard microscope, had been able to detect a swarm of active granules that could be seen only as tiny motile points. Because nothing of their individual structure could be ascertained, Kendall could not diagnose them with certainty to be filterable forms of the bacillus.

     

    In order to make certain, he went to California in late November of 1931 and examined his cultures under a Rife microscope at 5,000 diameters in the Pathological Laboratory of the Pasadena Hospital. The facilities were afforded through the offices of the same Drs. Johnson and Foord who has worked with Rife on the BX.

     

    When Rife finally got them in focus, the tiny granules were seen to be bright, highly motile, turquoise-blue bodies which, to quote the report he co-authored with Kendall, “contrasted strikingly both in color and their active motion with the non-colored debris of the medium.” The same observations were repeated eight separate times, the complete absence of similar bodies in uninoculated control media being noted.

     

    To further confirm their findings, Rife and Kendall next examined eighteen-hour-old specially cultured and inoculated colonies of the same bacillus because they had determined that it was precisely at this stage of growth that they became filterable. Now they could see three transitional forms of the same organism: one, the normal bacillus itself, almost devoid of color; two, the same bacillus but with a prominent turquoise-blue granule at one end of it; and three, the same turquoise-blue granules moving about independently.

     

    This was somewhat equivalent to being able to observe a caterpillar, its cocoon and the butterfly which emerges from the cocoon, all simultaneously.

     

    When they transplanted the filter-passing granules into a broth medium, they were seen under the Rife microscope to revert back to their original bacillus, or rod-like, form.

     

    At this juncture, the American bellwether journal, Science, got wind of Kendall’s work and, in a news story devoted to it, referred to the new “super-microscope” invented by Royal Raymond Rife. The same month, December 1931, the Rife-Kendall account was published in California and Western Medicine, the official mouthpiece of the state medical associations of California, Nevada, and Utah. This magazine also commented editorially that the Kendall-Rife article was to be particularly recommended to its readers because of its “calling the attention of the world to a new type of microscope which, if it fulfills its apparent advantages over any microscope thus far developed, bids fair to lay the basis for revolutionary discoveries in bacteriology and the allied sciences.”

     

    The editorial was significantly entitled: “Is a New Field About to Be Opened in the Science of Bacteriology?”

     

    Apparently it was about to die aborning.

     

    The Opposition Mounts

     

    The following month Kendall was invited to give the De Lamar lecture at the John Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public health in Baltimore, Maryland, before the Association of American Physicians. As a leader of the filtrationist school he attracted the attention of his adversaries, two of whom were invited as discussants.

     

    The first was an irascible, pugnacious curmudgeon, Dr. Thomas Rivers, of the well-heeled Rockefeller Institute of New York City, who was described by one of his institute colleagues as a “difficult and formidable person to oppose and could be stubbornly inflexible in maintaining a position.”

     

    When he learned of his invitation to discuss Kendall’s presentation of the work with the typhoid bacillus, Rivers hurriedly repeated experiments on which Kendall had worked for years and, by his own account, got no proof of Kendall’s claim. Based on this thin evidence, he arose at the John Hopkins meeting and, to quote him, “in a very temperate manner called the fellow a liar. Not in so many words. Actually, all I said was that I couldn’t repeat this experiment and I therefore didn’t believe his findings were true.”

     

    Rivers was followed in the discussion by the Harvard microbiologist, Dr. Hans Zinsser, also a “non-filtrationist,” who, to quote Rivers anew, “just gave Kendall bloody hell. I’d never seen Hans so hot in my life. I had to agree with everything he said — but I really felt sorry for poor old Kendall — he just sat there and took it.”

     

    In the midst of the venom and acerbity the only colleague to come to Kendall’s aid was the grand old man of bacteriology, and first teacher of the subject in the United States, Dr. William H. “Popsy” Welch, who evidently looked upon Kendall’s work with some regard.

     

    What is of interest today is that at the Baltimore meeting there seemed to be no mention of the Rife microscope. Also, in light of the apparent victory of the “non-filtrationists” over those who claimed that bacteria were filterable, it was curious that Rivers could claim to have repeated Kendall’s work without the use of the instrument Kendall had found so necessary to clearly reveal his filterable forms.

     

    Kendall’s work, however, attracted the rapt attention of the same Dr. Edward C. Rosenow who, in 1914, had been able to prove that stains of streptococcus were able, under the right conditions, to transmute one into the other. In that day he had written that these “conditions were more or less obscure. They seem to call forth new or latent energies which were previously not manifest and which now have gained the ascendancy.”

     

    As a filtrationist, Rosenow was a maverick among bacteriologists up to his death at 94 in the 1960’s. His work had convinced him, also prior to World War I, that organisms in sera — the fluids from tissues of immunized animals commonly used as antitoxins to neutralize microbes in the body — might in some patients have dangerous biological side effects.

     

    The main implication of Rosenow’s work in his own eyes was that bacteria were not as important to disease as the terrain on which they found themselves. “It would seem,” he wrote in his 1914 article, that focal infections are no longer to be looked upon merely as a place of entrance of bacteria but as a place where conditions are favorable for them to acquire the properties which give them a wide range of affinities for various structure.”

     

    Rosenow first became aware of Rife technique through a patient at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where Rosenow was employed. The patient was none other than the same Henry H. Timken who had financially aided Rife to develop his microscope and begin his research in the 1920’s.

     

    Rife came to Chicago with his microscope. Kendall invited Rosenow down to the Northwestern University Medical School to work with himself and Rife on July 5, 1923. For three days they made a restudy of the Kendall forms, Rosenow working with a Zeiss microscope, Kendall with an oil immersion dark-field instrument, and Rife with his special device. “The oval, motile, turquoise-blue bodies,” wrote Rosenow of this work, “described previously by Kendall and Rife were unmistakably demonstrated.”

     

    The three next decided to filter cultures of the streptococcus bacteria which Rosenow had found to be associated with poliomyelitis to see what the Rife scope might reveal. What they saw were not the blue bodies linked to the typhoid bacillus but cocci and diplococci of a brownish-gray color each surrounded by a strange halo. These could only be observed in the Rife microscope.

     

    Moreover filtrates of a virus considered to be the cause of encephalitis showed a considerable number of round forms, singly and in pairs, which under the special Rife illumination were pale pink in color and somewhat smaller than those seen in the poliomyelitis preparations.

     

    Rosenow’s work was panned by Rivers in public forum just as viciously as was Kendall’s. This was before Rosenow had worked with the Rife microscope. “I had one run-in with him,” said Rivers, “at a meeting held before the Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Diseases during Christmas week in 1931. I was pretty savage with him. Do you think that helped? Hell, no, if you ask me for my candid opinion, I think that most of the audience believed Rosenow.”

     

    This belief did not last for long. For a variety of reasons, including the very difficult methods of culturing the filterable forms of bacteria — and lack of the Rife microscope to observe them — the “church” of non-filtrationist bacteriology of which Rivers was later proclaimed “the apostolic father” (does one need better evidence of hierarchical priest hoods and priest-craft in science?) was putting the filtrationist camp on the defensive.

     

    Three filtrationists, writing of discoveries similar to those of Kendall, just prior to Kendall’s Johns Hopkins lecture, thus considered it necessary to state in their introduction: “It has come about these days that to express convictions that differ from the consensus gentium becomes almost professional foolhardiness: it brings down the strictures of one’s friends and enemies alike.”

     

    They added: “But we are also conscious of that fact that, beneath the tumult of controversy between monomorphism and pleomorphism, there is being born a new epoch in bacteriology, the limits of the significance of which and the possible future expansion of which no one can yet surmise.”

     

    Like all scientific revolutions the epoch would have to wait patiently for its time to come. Rosenow was held by his adversaries to be 100 percent wrong in many of his observations. His son, Dr. Edward C. Rosenow Jr., Chief Administrative Officer of the American College of Physicians, asserts that his father was all but accused by Rockefeller Institute research moguls of experimental dishonesty.

     

    How was it that none of Kendall’s or Rosenow’s attackers bothered to use the Rife microscope? Rife himself admitted that he was not confident that his experiments, revealing the BX form, could ever be repeated without the use of his scope. “We do not expect any laboratory,” he wrote, “to be able to produce the BX on account of the technique involved and adequate optical equipment. This is why we have never publicly announced that BX is the cause of cancer but we have succeeded in producing from its inoculation tumors with all the true characteristics and pathology of nepotistic tissue from which we have repeatedly recovered the BX virus.”

     

    At the end of his life Rosenow was philosophic about lack of acceptance for his findings among his colleagues. “There is no way,” he told his son, “to convince one’s peer group of something new until their attitude of receptivity changes. They simply won’t listen.” This echoes the German Noble laureate in physics, Max Planck, who started that for new ideas to be accepted, one had to wait for a generation of scientists to die off and a new one to replace it.

     

    The Search Continues

     

    With respect to Rife’s cancer observations, it may be that this process of replacement is now taking place.

     

    Rife’s work has a possible connection with research performed over the last twenty years by several pioneers. One pair of them are Dr. Irene Diller, a former long-time associate of the Institute for Cancer Research in Philadelphia, and Dr. Florence B. Seibert, Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry, University of Pennsylvania.

     

    One day in the late 1950’s Diller called Seibert, who won many awards and five honorary doctorates for her more than thirty-year long work on tuberculosis, and asked her to come and look at some microbes on slides. On the slides Seibert observed tiny round organisms. When Seibert learned that Diller had isolated them regularly from many other tumors, as well as from the blood of leukemia patients, she hastened to ask whether Diller could find them in a sarcoma tumor she, Seibert, was studying.

     

    After several weeks Diller showed Seibert a tube filled with a slightly grayish and moist-looking culture filled with small round cocci. Injected into mice, they produced cancerous tumors.

     

    Seibert became convinced that Diller might have found a link to cancer. Because so many scientists, believing Diller’s new forms to be merely “ubiquitous contaminants” in her cultures, were writing off her work as spurious, Seibert decided to continue working on the problem during her Florida retirement, first at the Mound Park — today the Bay Front — Hospital in Saint Petersburg, later at Veterans Administration Hospital.

     

    Blood samples from cancer patients with varying types of leukemia were obtained and from every one of them Seibert was able to isolate pleomorphic microbes. These bacterial forms were also isolated from tumors, and with a homologous vaccine they decreased tumors in mice. Just like those of the Rife-Kendall-Rosenow research, they could change from round to rod-shaped and even could become long thread-like filaments, depending on what medium they were grown and how long. They would pass a filter and at this stage in their life cycle they were about the same size as Rife’s BX forms.

     

    Today there is great stir about, and much money devoted to, viruses in relation to the cancer problem. The most recent edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica states that “sufficient evidence has been acquired to indicate that one or more viruses probably cause cancer in man,” and that carcinogens, or cancer-producing agents, “are suspected of producing cancers by activating viruses latent in the body.”

     

    But so far, little support is given to those who ascribe bacteria and the forms into which they transmute the ability for close association with cancer. This legacy of the non-filtrationist school persists in the face of mounting evidence that the filtrationists may have been right all along.

     

    These days, because various bacterial forms have been noted to have anomalies in their cellular walls — how could they develop into smaller forms if they could not leap beyond or through the walls which imprison them? — they are known as Cell Wall Deficient Forms. A revolutionary new book about them has been written by the Wayne State University microbiologist, Dr. Lida H. Mattman. Her text opens with the statement: “Clandestine, almost unrecognizable, polymorphous bacterial growth seems to occur as often as the stereotypical classical boxcars of bacilli and pearls of cocci . . .” The book’s contents would seem to indicate that the new era predicted in 1931 for filtrationist microbiology is dawning though presently its adherents are having great difficulty both in publishing their work and getting grants for further research.

     

    Sufficient data, writes Mattman, have been amassed to warrant reinvestigation, and adds: “There is no subject generally viewed with greater skepticism than an association between bacteria and human cancer. However, the medical profession may look back with irony at the stony reception given by his home colleagues to Koch’s paper elucidating the etiology of tuberculosis. Similarly, medical students were once taught that whooping cough vaccination was an unrealistic dream reported only by two women at the Michigan Public Health Laboratories and by a pediatrician named Sauer.”

     

    Most importantly, she concludes: “One must always consider that most malignancies are accompanied by an immuno-deficiency. . . . Therefore, we could be dealing with microbe that finds such a host merely a suitable environment for habitation.”

     

    This is very close to Rife’s own statement that he had unequivocally demonstrated that “it was the chemical constituents and chemical radicals of an organism which enacted upon the unbalanced cell metabolism of the human body to produce disease.” Before he died, Rife stated: “We have in many instances produced all the symptoms of a disease chemically in experimental animals without the inoculation of any virus or bacteria into their tissues.”

    Rife_newsarticle

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    What, then, of Royal Raymond Rife and his microscope?

     

    Lingering Questions

     

    How is it that biologists and physicians, other that Kendall and Rosenow, did not rush to investigate it? Why haven’t physicists looked into the effects Rife achieved with electromagnetic waves of specific frequencies upon disease, including cancer?

     

    Similar effects were observed by Dr. Georges Lakhovsky in Paris who developed a wave emitter called a multiwave oscillator with which he cured cancer in plants and humans as well as other diseases. The multi-wave oscillator is today banned by the FDA as quackery. They have also been noted in Bordeaux by another inventor, self-taught as was Rife, Antoine Priore, whose apparatus combines the use of electromagnetic radiation with a plasma of helium or noble gases reminiscent of Rife’s method used in detecting and devitalizing BX.

     

    Are the strange blue, motile forms which Dr. Wilhelm Reich discovered in the late 1930’s and for which he coined the word bions related to the foregoing? Reich observed the bions to spontaneously proliferate from specially treated organic matter and even from coal and sand! Spontaneous generation of life was supposed to have been laid to rest in Reich’s time, as it is in ours, and he was accused by fellow scientists of confusing Brownian movement of subcellular particles or debris in his cultures with the new subcellular forms he claimed to have discovered.

     

    In cancerous patients Reich observed the bions to degenerate into what he called T-bacilli (the T coming from the German word, Tod, meaning death). When injected into mice, they caused cancer just like Rife’s BX forms.

     

    In Copenhagen, a biophysicist, Scott Hill, reports that a new book written in Russian by two researchers at the Kazakh State University in the USSR deals with a whole new branch of medical science in which “healing” of various disorders is being accomplished by the use of ultraweak, monocromatic laser light. Shades of Rife!

    #3198
    EKEK
    Keymaster

     

    What Has Become of the Rife Microscope?

    Written by Christopher Bird

     

     

     

    Did Royal Raymond Rife find a bacterial agent associated with cancer?

     

    Did this inventor discover a means of electromagnetically curing cancer?

     

    Has one clique of scientists been able to suppress truth for half a century?

     

     

     

    This article, like an embryo or any living thing, is still growing. A continuation of this growth may depend upon the assistance of NAJ readers, their colleagues and their friends.

     

    Originally I intended to write a short note on what was known about the Rife microscope. Precious little is in print on the subject.

     

    One day, while waiting for some material to come up from the cellar-stacks of the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland, considerably frustrated by the lack of leads and data concerning the demise of the Rife microscope, I wandered by the Subject Card Catalogue and casually flipped at random to a card in the middle of a drawer labeled “Microscopes.”

     

    The card was filed under ” Allied Industries,” as if that firm were the author. The company’s address was stated to be 4246 Pepper Drive, San Diego, California. The title referenced was “History of the Development of a Successful Treatment for Cancer and Other Virus, Bacteria and Fungi.”

     

    At the bottom of the card was a single line: “Written by Dr. R.R. Rife.”

     

    Entirely by accident I had stumbled upon what looked to be only one of a series of reports written by Royal Raymond Rife. Fourteen pages long, it was numbered Dev-1042. It was approved and signed by J.F. Crane, Manager; Don Tully, Development Associate; and Verne Thompson, Chief Electrical Engineer.

     

    Are any of these gentlemen alive today?

     

    Was Allied Industries a research corporation established by Rife?

     

    How many other reports did it publish and where are they?

     

    The report so riveted my attention that I was compelled to explore some of the history of microbiology and its connection to cancer and other disease. The present article, much longer than originally planned, is thus the result of a fortuitous finding — perhaps an example of what Jung has called “synchronicity” — and the consequent preliminary exploration.

     

    Much more needs to be done to tell the story of Rife and his microscope, a fascinating episode in the history of science.

     

    The Microscope of Microscopes

     

    In February 1944 the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia published an article, “The New Microscopes,” in its prestigious journal devoted to applied science. Founded in 1824 by “philosopher-mechanics,” the institute, which recently made studies in its physics laboratory on the way to move the Liberty Bell to its new Bicentennial Year location, is a smaller analog of the huge world-famous Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. which reprinted the same article in its own journal shortly after its first appearance.

     

    Authored by R.E. Seidel, M.D., a Philadelphia physician and his research assistant, M. Elizabeth Winter, the essay opened with a six-page discussion of the electron microscope, which had only recently been put on the market by the Radio Corporation of America.

     

    This microscope is today standard equipment in modern laboratories.

     

    The article closed with a ten-page treatment of a “Universal Microscope,” the brainchild of a San Diego autodidact, Royal Raymond Rife, who developed it with the financial assistance of the roller-bearing and axle magnate Henry H. Timken, for whose family Rife at one time served as handyman and chauffeur.

     

    Rife’s scope, the largest model of which consisted of 5,682 parts and required a large bench to accommodate it, overcame the greatest disadvantage of the electron microscope, its inability — because tiny living organisms put in it are vacuum and subject to protoplasmic changes induced by a virtual hail-storm of electrons — to reveal specimens in their natural living state.

     

    With his invention Rife was able to look at living organisms. What he saw convinced him that germs could be not the cause, but the result of disease; that, depending on its state, the body could convert a harmless bacterium into a lethal pathogen; that such pathogens could be instantly killed, each by a specific frequency of light; and that cells, regarded as the irreducible building-blocks of living matter, are actually composed of smaller cells, themselves made up of even smaller cells, this process continuing with higher and higher magnification in a sixteen-step, stage-by-stage journey into the micro-beyond.

     

    Though with the aid of Rife’s device, thousands of still pictures and hundreds of feet of movie film were made to reveal these facts, all of this material and the Rife microscopes seem to have disappeared without a trace.

     

    Or have they?

     

    Calls to the U.S. Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Medical Museum, which has hundreds of different microscopes in its historical collection, to the National Library of Medicine’s Historical Division, to the Smithsonian Institution and the Franklin Institute, both repositories for outstanding scientific inventions, and to a dozen establishments dealing daily in microscopy elicited from curators, medical pathologists, physicians and other scientific specialists only the complaint that none of them had ever heard of Royal Raymond Rife and his microscope.

    Royal Rife_0

     

    What has become of the Rife microscope?

     

    The question is not rhetorical. For if even half of the possibilities described for this astounding discovery are true, a massive effort to hunt it down and reactivate its potential might not only save billions of dollars in biological and medical research but open a fascinating new vista onto the natural of life.

     

    From the start, Rife’s main goal was to find cures for diseases, especially the most intractable of all diseases, cancer. Because he had a hunch that some as yet undiscovered micro-organism would prove to play a crucial role in the onset of this malignancy, he tried unsuccessfully to find one by observing all types of malignant tissue with a variety of standard research microscopes.

     

    In the 1920’s it became obvious to Rife that a better means of scrutinizing the micro-world than had been developed was indispensable. During that decade he designed and built five microscopes with a range from 5,000 to 50,000 diameters at a time when the best laboratory microscopes in use could achieve not more than 2,000 diameters of magnification.

     

    At the Rife Research Laboratory on Point Loma, California, he worked at magnifications of 17,000 and higher, to reveal a host of cells and micro-organisms never before seen and to photograph them. The work required a saint’s patience. It could take the best part of a day to bring a single target specimen into focus.

     

    The Rife microscope has several arresting features. Its entire optical system of fourteen lenses and prisms, as well as an illuminating unit, were made of crystal quartz which is transparent to ultraviolet radiation. In the scope, light was bent and polarized in such a way that a specimen could be illuminated by extremely narrow parts of the whole spectrum, one part at a time, and even by a single frequency of light.

     

    Rife maintained that he could thus select specific frequency, or frequencies, of light which coordinated and resonated which a specimen’s chemical constituents so that a given specimen would emit its own light of a characteristic and unique color. Specimens could be easily identified, thus solving one of microscopy’s greatest bugaboos. It was control of illumination which turned the trick.

     

    Another feature was the microscope’s extraordinary resolution, its ability to reveal the most minute of component parts of any specimen so that each may be seen distinctly and separately from the others. Imagine two extremely thin parallel lines. When they can be clearly distinguished you are still within the microscope’s range of resolution. If the parallel lines blur together, high magnification will only enlarge the distortion and limit of resolution has been attained. With a resolving power of 31,000 diameters — as against 2,000 to 2,500 for the laboratory microscopes in common use in that day — Rife’s device could focus clearly on five lines of a standardized grid whereas an ordinary microscope could do no better than examine fifty lines, and that with considerable aberration.

     

    This is somewhat equivalent to one aerial camera’s being able to spot individual houses in city blocks from a very great height while another is able only fuzzily to distinguish the single city blocks themselves.

     

    Controversial Discoveries

     

    Beginning in the 1920’s and continuing over seven years, Rife and his colleagues worked on more than 20,000 laboratory cultures of cancer obtained from the Paradise Valley Sanitarium in National City, California, in what appeared at first to be a fruitless effort to isolate micro-organisms which he felt should somehow be associated with the disease.

     

    Up to then bacteria had clearly been proved to be linked with a wide variety of ills including tuberculosis, leprosy, cholera, gonorrhea, syphilis, thyroid, bubonic plague, pneumonia and others. But no one had found them in association with cancer.

     

    In contrast to the much smaller viruses, bacteria were widely considered to be unicellular, monomorphic — meaning one shape and one shape only — forms. A quarter of a million of them can occupy a space no larger than the period at the end of this sentence. They come in various shapes. Cocci are round, bacilli rod-like, to offer but two examples.

     

    There are various forms for each shape. Of the round-shaped ones, monococci appear singly, diplococci come in pairs, staphylococci in clusters resembling a bunch of grapes, streptococci, which under certain conditions can produce a painful sore throat in chains.

     

    While outside a host, or body, bacteria are hard to raise, or culture. Each type has been studied as a pure culture only by isolating it upon a specific nutrient, called media.

     

    Bacteria also have specific maximum, minimum, and optimum temperatures at which they will live and multiply. Some, like polar bears, are addicted to arctic temperatures and even live in ice. Others prefer water so hot it would kill most animals. A great many enjoy the temperature of the human body. Millions of them are living, harmlessly, inside you right now.

     

    But they are not always harmless. They can acquire virulence, or the power to cause disease under some conditions but not others, although even today no one knows exactly why.

     

    This mystery, in the 1920’s, was closely connected to a debate in microbiology so hot as to seem almost like a war. On one side were those who affirmed — as do many textbooks today — that bacteria were eternally monomorphic. They could not assume other or smaller forms, as small, say, as a virus.

     

    Originally, virus — the word means “poison” in Latin — was the name generally applied to any microscopic agent injurious to living cells. Now it is much more narrowly defined as “one of a unique group of very small infectious agents that grow only in cells of animals (including humans), plants and also bacteria.”

     

    Because they were so small, viruses would pass through filters which did not allow the passage of bacteria, said to be monomorphic, just as a net of small enough mesh will allow minnows to pass through it but bring the fish that are preying upon them up short.

     

    It is this filter-passing ability of viruses which is widely held today — along with their inability to grow on artificial media — to be one of the main criteria separating them from bacteria.

     

    For several decades, however, another school of microbiologists maintained that, far from holding everlastingly to one shape, bacteria were pleomorphic, or form-changing. They could be caused, under the right conditions of culture, to metamorphize into forms small enough to pass through filters just like viruses.

     

    Because of their sharp disagreement on the filtrability of bacteria, the two camps came to be called “filtrationist” and “non-filtrationist.”

     

    One of the earliest of the filtrationists was a Swedish physician and explorer, Ernst Bernhard Almquist, for whom islands off the north Siberian coast are named. Almquist made hundreds of observations of plemorphic bacteria in his laboratory as did researchers in Italy, Russia, France, Germany and the United States. In 1922, after two decades of work, Almquist came to the conclusion that “nobody can pretend to know the complete life cycle and all the varieties of even a single bacterial species. It would be an assumption to think so.”

     

    Way back in 1914, the American bacteriologist, Dr. Edward C. Rosenow, had the gall to assert that bacteria were not unalterable and that various strains, or what one might call sub-sub-species of them, could, when suitably treated, become any of the other strains. It was Rosenow’s contention, too, that he found a form of the streptococcus bacterium which caused poliomyelitis, commonly know as infantile paralysis.

     

    What Rife’s opinions were about this heated controversy are not known. He followed the standard bacteriological practice of the day, first implanting small patches of cancer tissues on various nutritive media including a special “K” medium developed by another filtrationist, Dr. Arthur Isaac Kendall, at the Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. The medium which bore the first letter of Kendall’s name, seemed to have the faculty of transforming bacteria into transitional forms alleged for them by the filtrationist school.

     

    No matter how often he changed menus for his sought-after cancer microbe, no matter how he altered the temperature of incubation, Rife seemed unable to coax it to appear in his cultures.

     

    It was apparently only when, as a result of his continuing physical experimentation with the effects of light frequencies, he discovered that many microbes respond to the effects of light from noble gases, such as neon, xenon and argon, by changing their growth patterns that Rife hit upon a solution to the problem that was nagging him.

     

    He placed a sealed test-tube containing cancer tissue into a closed loop filled with argon gas. After creating a vacuum within the loop, he charged the gas with electricity, just as one does when one throws the switch to light up the neon lamps in modern offices, though in Rife’s case the charge was 5000 volts. While he still could not reveal any microbes, he noted a certain cloudiness in nutritive medium which, through chemical analysis, he ascribed to ionization caused by the electronic bombardment.

     

    Readers may well wonder why he adopted so strange and novel a process. The question is just as unanswerable as if put about Rife’s next step: in order, he said, to counter the ionization, he placed the tube into a two-inch water vacuum and heated it for twenty-four hours at near body temperature.

     

    Under his microscope, at 20,000X, the tube now teemed with animated forms measuring only 1/20 by 1/15 of a micron — much smaller than any known bacteria. They refracted a purplish-red color in the specific light beam.

     

    He called this form Bacillus X and, later, because it was so much smaller than other bacilli, and perhaps because of the filtrability controversy, BX virus. This problem of nomenclature can be resolved herein by referring to Rife’s organism as a BX for, or simply BX.

     

    Rife writes ” this method of ionization and oxidation brought the chemical refraction of BX out of the ultraviolet and into the visible band of the spectrum. Owing to the fact that the test-tube specimens had gone through so many trials, we again started from scratch and repeated this method 104 consecutive times with identical results.”

     

    Because he could culture his BX form, so small it would pass through any filter, he seemed to have discovered a filtrable form of a bacterium. But just finding bacteria, even in filtrable form, in a human tumor does not necessarily imply that they are its cause. To make sure, it is held they must be reinjected into animals and seen to cause the same or nearly similar disease, after which they must then be reisolated and shown to resemble the original organism. These were the postulates propounded by the German pioneer bacteriologist, Robert Koch, who proved that tuberculosis was apparently caused by the tubercule bacillus.

     

    Following this accepted procedure, Rife inoculated the new BX forms into over 400 rats in all of which there subsequently appeared “tumors with all the true pathology of neoplastic tissue.” Some of the tumors became so large they exceeded the total weight of the individual rats in which they were developing. When the tumors were surgically removed, the BX form was recovered from them in all cases. Koch’s postulates were fulfilled.

     

    More Startling Discoveries

     

    By continued microscopical study and repeated photography to stop their motion, Rife and his co-workers next came to the baffling conclusion that the BX, far from remaining always what he had seen as the purplish-red bodies a fraction of a micron in dimension, could change into not just fairly similar forms as Rosenow had previously discovered, but into completely different forms simply by altering the medium on which they were living only very slightly.

     

    “Slightly” in Rife’s case meant an alteration in the nutrient environment of only two parts per million by volume. Those who would consider this unlikely may recall that in homeopathic medicine doses of remedies are given in dilutions of this weakness and beyond. Even though they have nothing chemically analyzable in them, they are effective.

     

    One such alteration caused the BX to become what Rife called a Bacillus Y, or BY. It was still the same purplish-red color as the BX by so enlarged that it would not pass through a filter.

     

    With the second change of the medium, the BY enlarged still further into a monococcoid or single disk form which, when properly stained, could be viewed under a standard research microscope. Rife claimed that these forms could be found in the blood of over 90% of cancer victims.

     

    By removing this form from the fluid medium it inhabited and depositing it onto a hard base of asparagus or tomato agar, Rife then saw it miraculously develop into a fungus, making it kin to a yeast, mold or mushroom.

     

    Any of these succeeding forms, Rife stated, could be changed back within thirty-six hours into a BX form capable of producing cancer tumors in experimental animals from which, in turn, the same BX form could again be recovered.

     

    The transformation did not stop with the fungus which, if allowed to stand dormantly as a stock culture for a year and then replanted onto the asparagus medium, would then change into bacillus coli, millions of which live in the human intestine. This common bacillus could pass, in Rife’s words, “any known laboratory method of analysis.”

     

    Because he had found that micro-organisms had the ability to luminate when stimulated by given frequencies of light it occurred to Rife that they might also be devitalized by beaming radiations of specific frequencies upon them. One source has it that the harmonics of these frequencies ranged from ten meters to twenty thousand meters.

     

    To this end, he had been developing concurrently with his microscopic equipment a special frequency emitter which he continued to improve, up to at least 1953, as steady advances in electronics continued. The killing waves were projected through a tube filled with helium gas and said to be efficient in destroying micro–organisms at a distance of as much as one thousand feet.

     

    With this device he noted that while the proper mortal oscillatory rate was reached, many lethal organisms such as those of tuberculosis, typhoid, leprosy, hoof-and-mouth disease and others appeared to disintegrate or “blow up” in the field of his microscope. This “death ray” principle was also effective when applied to cultured BX.

     

    The obvious next step was to determine whether similar radiation would affect the BX, not in culture, but in the bodies of cancer-afflicted animals. It apparently did so, for Rife states he got rid of BX in over 400 experimental rats and other animals in his lab. If it worked on animal cancers, wondered Rife, why not on human cancers?

     

    The answer was so resoundingly yes that, in our day when billions are being spent each year to find a cure for cancer, it is prudent to quote Rife’s report word for word: “The first clinical work on cancer was completed under the supervision of Milbank Johnson, M.D., which was set up under a special medical Research Committee of the University of Southern California. Sixteen cases were treated at the clinic for many types of malignancy. After three months, fourteen of these so-called hopeless cases were signed off as clinically cured by a staff of five medical doctors and Alvin G. Foord, M.D., pathologist for the group. The treatments consisted of three minutes duration using the frequency instrument which was set on the mortal oscillatory rate for BX, or cancer, at three-day intervals. It was found that the elapsed time between treatments attains better results than cases treated daily.”

     

    The News Leaks Out

     

    News of Rife’s work began to leak out to the world of medicine at the end of the 1920’s. One of the first to learn of it was Arthur W. Yale, M.D., who lived in San Diego, not far from Rife’s laboratory. He acquired a frequency emitter and began to treat cancerous patients.

     

    In 1940, reporting to his fellow physicians on some of his decade-long results, he wrote that because the whole of Rife’s extraordinary findings constituted an “entirely new theory of the origin and cause of cancer, and the treatment and results have been so unique and unbelievable,” he was making his findings available in the hope that “after further research we may eliminate the second largest cause of deaths in the United States.”

     

    Yale had had limited success in treating cancerous tumors with X-rays and with the use of what he called “static wave current” for some three decades. When he began to use Rife’s device, he sometimes employed it alone, sometimes together, with the two methods with which he was familiar. Both methods brought startlingly successful results. Yale was careful to note that, when he added the use of the Rife ray to his other radiation, cancerous masses “have disappeared in about one-tenth the time and so far with no reoccurrences.”

     

    Dr. Arthur Isaac Kendall, whose “K” medium Rife had used in his experimentation, was also determined to check whether viable bacteria in the filterable state could be unequivocally seen by Rife’s microscope. Kendall had been working with cultures of typhoid bacillus and, under a standard microscope, had been able to detect a swarm of active granules that could be seen only as tiny motile points. Because nothing of their individual structure could be ascertained, Kendall could not diagnose them with certainty to be filterable forms of the bacillus.

     

    In order to make certain, he went to California in late November of 1931 and examined his cultures under a Rife microscope at 5,000 diameters in the Pathological Laboratory of the Pasadena Hospital. The facilities were afforded through the offices of the same Drs. Johnson and Foord who has worked with Rife on the BX.

     

    When Rife finally got them in focus, the tiny granules were seen to be bright, highly motile, turquoise-blue bodies which, to quote the report he co-authored with Kendall, “contrasted strikingly both in color and their active motion with the non-colored debris of the medium.” The same observations were repeated eight separate times, the complete absence of similar bodies in uninoculated control media being noted.

     

    To further confirm their findings, Rife and Kendall next examined eighteen-hour-old specially cultured and inoculated colonies of the same bacillus because they had determined that it was precisely at this stage of growth that they became filterable. Now they could see three transitional forms of the same organism: one, the normal bacillus itself, almost devoid of color; two, the same bacillus but with a prominent turquoise-blue granule at one end of it; and three, the same turquoise-blue granules moving about independently.

     

    This was somewhat equivalent to being able to observe a caterpillar, its cocoon and the butterfly which emerges from the cocoon, all simultaneously.

     

    When they transplanted the filter-passing granules into a broth medium, they were seen under the Rife microscope to revert back to their original bacillus, or rod-like, form.

     

    At this juncture, the American bellwether journal, Science, got wind of Kendall’s work and, in a news story devoted to it, referred to the new “super-microscope” invented by Royal Raymond Rife. The same month, December 1931, the Rife-Kendall account was published in California and Western Medicine, the official mouthpiece of the state medical associations of California, Nevada, and Utah. This magazine also commented editorially that the Kendall-Rife article was to be particularly recommended to its readers because of its “calling the attention of the world to a new type of microscope which, if it fulfills its apparent advantages over any microscope thus far developed, bids fair to lay the basis for revolutionary discoveries in bacteriology and the allied sciences.”

     

    The editorial was significantly entitled: “Is a New Field About to Be Opened in the Science of Bacteriology?”

     

    Apparently it was about to die aborning.

     

    The Opposition Mounts

     

    The following month Kendall was invited to give the De Lamar lecture at the John Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public health in Baltimore, Maryland, before the Association of American Physicians. As a leader of the filtrationist school he attracted the attention of his adversaries, two of whom were invited as discussants.

     

    The first was an irascible, pugnacious curmudgeon, Dr. Thomas Rivers, of the well-heeled Rockefeller Institute of New York City, who was described by one of his institute colleagues as a “difficult and formidable person to oppose and could be stubbornly inflexible in maintaining a position.”

     

    When he learned of his invitation to discuss Kendall’s presentation of the work with the typhoid bacillus, Rivers hurriedly repeated experiments on which Kendall had worked for years and, by his own account, got no proof of Kendall’s claim. Based on this thin evidence, he arose at the John Hopkins meeting and, to quote him, “in a very temperate manner called the fellow a liar. Not in so many words. Actually, all I said was that I couldn’t repeat this experiment and I therefore didn’t believe his findings were true.”

     

    Rivers was followed in the discussion by the Harvard microbiologist, Dr. Hans Zinsser, also a “non-filtrationist,” who, to quote Rivers anew, “just gave Kendall bloody hell. I’d never seen Hans so hot in my life. I had to agree with everything he said — but I really felt sorry for poor old Kendall — he just sat there and took it.”

     

    In the midst of the venom and acerbity the only colleague to come to Kendall’s aid was the grand old man of bacteriology, and first teacher of the subject in the United States, Dr. William H. “Popsy” Welch, who evidently looked upon Kendall’s work with some regard.

     

    What is of interest today is that at the Baltimore meeting there seemed to be no mention of the Rife microscope. Also, in light of the apparent victory of the “non-filtrationists” over those who claimed that bacteria were filterable, it was curious that Rivers could claim to have repeated Kendall’s work without the use of the instrument Kendall had found so necessary to clearly reveal his filterable forms.

     

    Kendall’s work, however, attracted the rapt attention of the same Dr. Edward C. Rosenow who, in 1914, had been able to prove that stains of streptococcus were able, under the right conditions, to transmute one into the other. In that day he had written that these “conditions were more or less obscure. They seem to call forth new or latent energies which were previously not manifest and which now have gained the ascendancy.”

     

    As a filtrationist, Rosenow was a maverick among bacteriologists up to his death at 94 in the 1960’s. His work had convinced him, also prior to World War I, that organisms in sera — the fluids from tissues of immunized animals commonly used as antitoxins to neutralize microbes in the body — might in some patients have dangerous biological side effects.

     

    The main implication of Rosenow’s work in his own eyes was that bacteria were not as important to disease as the terrain on which they found themselves. “It would seem,” he wrote in his 1914 article, that focal infections are no longer to be looked upon merely as a place of entrance of bacteria but as a place where conditions are favorable for them to acquire the properties which give them a wide range of affinities for various structure.”

     

    Rosenow first became aware of Rife technique through a patient at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where Rosenow was employed. The patient was none other than the same Henry H. Timken who had financially aided Rife to develop his microscope and begin his research in the 1920’s.

     

    Rife came to Chicago with his microscope. Kendall invited Rosenow down to the Northwestern University Medical School to work with himself and Rife on July 5, 1923. For three days they made a restudy of the Kendall forms, Rosenow working with a Zeiss microscope, Kendall with an oil immersion dark-field instrument, and Rife with his special device. “The oval, motile, turquoise-blue bodies,” wrote Rosenow of this work, “described previously by Kendall and Rife were unmistakably demonstrated.”

     

    The three next decided to filter cultures of the streptococcus bacteria which Rosenow had found to be associated with poliomyelitis to see what the Rife scope might reveal. What they saw were not the blue bodies linked to the typhoid bacillus but cocci and diplococci of a brownish-gray color each surrounded by a strange halo. These could only be observed in the Rife microscope.

     

    Moreover filtrates of a virus considered to be the cause of encephalitis showed a considerable number of round forms, singly and in pairs, which under the special Rife illumination were pale pink in color and somewhat smaller than those seen in the poliomyelitis preparations.

     

    Rosenow’s work was panned by Rivers in public forum just as viciously as was Kendall’s. This was before Rosenow had worked with the Rife microscope. “I had one run-in with him,” said Rivers, “at a meeting held before the Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Diseases during Christmas week in 1931. I was pretty savage with him. Do you think that helped? Hell, no, if you ask me for my candid opinion, I think that most of the audience believed Rosenow.”

     

    This belief did not last for long. For a variety of reasons, including the very difficult methods of culturing the filterable forms of bacteria — and lack of the Rife microscope to observe them — the “church” of non-filtrationist bacteriology of which Rivers was later proclaimed “the apostolic father” (does one need better evidence of hierarchical priest hoods and priest-craft in science?) was putting the filtrationist camp on the defensive.

     

    Three filtrationists, writing of discoveries similar to those of Kendall, just prior to Kendall’s Johns Hopkins lecture, thus considered it necessary to state in their introduction: “It has come about these days that to express convictions that differ from the consensus gentium becomes almost professional foolhardiness: it brings down the strictures of one’s friends and enemies alike.”

     

    They added: “But we are also conscious of that fact that, beneath the tumult of controversy between monomorphism and pleomorphism, there is being born a new epoch in bacteriology, the limits of the significance of which and the possible future expansion of which no one can yet surmise.”

     

    Like all scientific revolutions the epoch would have to wait patiently for its time to come. Rosenow was held by his adversaries to be 100 percent wrong in many of his observations. His son, Dr. Edward C. Rosenow Jr., Chief Administrative Officer of the American College of Physicians, asserts that his father was all but accused by Rockefeller Institute research moguls of experimental dishonesty.

     

    How was it that none of Kendall’s or Rosenow’s attackers bothered to use the Rife microscope? Rife himself admitted that he was not confident that his experiments, revealing the BX form, could ever be repeated without the use of his scope. “We do not expect any laboratory,” he wrote, “to be able to produce the BX on account of the technique involved and adequate optical equipment. This is why we have never publicly announced that BX is the cause of cancer but we have succeeded in producing from its inoculation tumors with all the true characteristics and pathology of nepotistic tissue from which we have repeatedly recovered the BX virus.”

     

    At the end of his life Rosenow was philosophic about lack of acceptance for his findings among his colleagues. “There is no way,” he told his son, “to convince one’s peer group of something new until their attitude of receptivity changes. They simply won’t listen.” This echoes the German Noble laureate in physics, Max Planck, who started that for new ideas to be accepted, one had to wait for a generation of scientists to die off and a new one to replace it.

     

    The Search Continues

     

    With respect to Rife’s cancer observations, it may be that this process of replacement is now taking place.

     

    Rife’s work has a possible connection with research performed over the last twenty years by several pioneers. One pair of them are Dr. Irene Diller, a former long-time associate of the Institute for Cancer Research in Philadelphia, and Dr. Florence B. Seibert, Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry, University of Pennsylvania.

     

    One day in the late 1950’s Diller called Seibert, who won many awards and five honorary doctorates for her more than thirty-year long work on tuberculosis, and asked her to come and look at some microbes on slides. On the slides Seibert observed tiny round organisms. When Seibert learned that Diller had isolated them regularly from many other tumors, as well as from the blood of leukemia patients, she hastened to ask whether Diller could find them in a sarcoma tumor she, Seibert, was studying.

     

    After several weeks Diller showed Seibert a tube filled with a slightly grayish and moist-looking culture filled with small round cocci. Injected into mice, they produced cancerous tumors.

     

    Seibert became convinced that Diller might have found a link to cancer. Because so many scientists, believing Diller’s new forms to be merely “ubiquitous contaminants” in her cultures, were writing off her work as spurious, Seibert decided to continue working on the problem during her Florida retirement, first at the Mound Park — today the Bay Front — Hospital in Saint Petersburg, later at Veterans Administration Hospital.

     

    Blood samples from cancer patients with varying types of leukemia were obtained and from every one of them Seibert was able to isolate pleomorphic microbes. These bacterial forms were also isolated from tumors, and with a homologous vaccine they decreased tumors in mice. Just like those of the Rife-Kendall-Rosenow research, they could change from round to rod-shaped and even could become long thread-like filaments, depending on what medium they were grown and how long. They would pass a filter and at this stage in their life cycle they were about the same size as Rife’s BX forms.

     

    Today there is great stir about, and much money devoted to, viruses in relation to the cancer problem. The most recent edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica states that “sufficient evidence has been acquired to indicate that one or more viruses probably cause cancer in man,” and that carcinogens, or cancer-producing agents, “are suspected of producing cancers by activating viruses latent in the body.”

     

    But so far, little support is given to those who ascribe bacteria and the forms into which they transmute the ability for close association with cancer. This legacy of the non-filtrationist school persists in the face of mounting evidence that the filtrationists may have been right all along.

     

    These days, because various bacterial forms have been noted to have anomalies in their cellular walls — how could they develop into smaller forms if they could not leap beyond or through the walls which imprison them? — they are known as Cell Wall Deficient Forms. A revolutionary new book about them has been written by the Wayne State University microbiologist, Dr. Lida H. Mattman. Her text opens with the statement: “Clandestine, almost unrecognizable, polymorphous bacterial growth seems to occur as often as the stereotypical classical boxcars of bacilli and pearls of cocci . . .” The book’s contents would seem to indicate that the new era predicted in 1931 for filtrationist microbiology is dawning though presently its adherents are having great difficulty both in publishing their work and getting grants for further research.

     

    Sufficient data, writes Mattman, have been amassed to warrant reinvestigation, and adds: “There is no subject generally viewed with greater skepticism than an association between bacteria and human cancer. However, the medical profession may look back with irony at the stony reception given by his home colleagues to Koch’s paper elucidating the etiology of tuberculosis. Similarly, medical students were once taught that whooping cough vaccination was an unrealistic dream reported only by two women at the Michigan Public Health Laboratories and by a pediatrician named Sauer.”

     

    Most importantly, she concludes: “One must always consider that most malignancies are accompanied by an immuno-deficiency. . . . Therefore, we could be dealing with microbe that finds such a host merely a suitable environment for habitation.”

     

    This is very close to Rife’s own statement that he had unequivocally demonstrated that “it was the chemical constituents and chemical radicals of an organism which enacted upon the unbalanced cell metabolism of the human body to produce disease.” Before he died, Rife stated: “We have in many instances produced all the symptoms of a disease chemically in experimental animals without the inoculation of any virus or bacteria into their tissues.”

    Rife_newsarticle

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    What, then, of Royal Raymond Rife and his microscope?

     

    Lingering Questions

     

    How is it that biologists and physicians, other that Kendall and Rosenow, did not rush to investigate it? Why haven’t physicists looked into the effects Rife achieved with electromagnetic waves of specific frequencies upon disease, including cancer?

     

    Similar effects were observed by Dr. Georges Lakhovsky in Paris who developed a wave emitter called a multiwave oscillator with which he cured cancer in plants and humans as well as other diseases. The multi-wave oscillator is today banned by the FDA as quackery. They have also been noted in Bordeaux by another inventor, self-taught as was Rife, Antoine Priore, whose apparatus combines the use of electromagnetic radiation with a plasma of helium or noble gases reminiscent of Rife’s method used in detecting and devitalizing BX.

     

    Are the strange blue, motile forms which Dr. Wilhelm Reich discovered in the late 1930’s and for which he coined the word bions related to the foregoing? Reich observed the bions to spontaneously proliferate from specially treated organic matter and even from coal and sand! Spontaneous generation of life was supposed to have been laid to rest in Reich’s time, as it is in ours, and he was accused by fellow scientists of confusing Brownian movement of subcellular particles or debris in his cultures with the new subcellular forms he claimed to have discovered.

     

    In cancerous patients Reich observed the bions to degenerate into what he called T-bacilli (the T coming from the German word, Tod, meaning death). When injected into mice, they caused cancer just like Rife’s BX forms.

     

    In Copenhagen, a biophysicist, Scott Hill, reports that a new book written in Russian by two researchers at the Kazakh State University in the USSR deals with a whole new branch of medical science in which “healing” of various disorders is being accomplished by the use of ultraweak, monocromatic laser light. Shades of Rife!

    #3199
    EKEK
    Keymaster

    “The earlier concept of a universe made up of physical particles interacting according to fixed laws is no longer tenable. It is implicit in present findings that action rather than matter is basic. . . This is good news, for it is no longer appropriate to think of the universe as a gradually subsiding agitation of billiard balls. The universe, far from being a desert of inert particles, is a theatre of increasingly complex organization, a stage for development in which man has a definite place, without any upper limit to his evolution.”

    –Arthur M. Young
    The Reflexive Universe

    http://www.arthuryoung.com/

    My late husband Chris Bird and I were so blessed to visit numerous times with Arthur and Ruth Forbes Young.

    Chris considered Arthur his mentor and spent many months interviewing him at his home in California.

    Here is one of those interviews:

     

    A noted inventor and cosmologist discusses his theories of consciousness and the universe that explain psychic phenomena.

    Arthur M. Young

    by Christopher Bird

     

    CBird: The theory developed in your new books, The Reflexive Universe and The Geometry of Meaning should attract anyone trying to understand ESP and the psychic. Would you explain it?

    YOUNG: One can more easily come to grips with ESP when one realizes that there are phenomena which cannot be explained by the laws of classical physics, the constraints of which apply only to microscopic objects, or those made of millions of particles. Quantum mechanics, itself a part of physics, is also one of the phenomena.

    My theory — or more correctly, model — postulates two objective and two projective levels of existence. Of the latter one transcends space, the other space and time. The former can account for telepathy and dowsing, the latter for precognition and prophecy.

    CBird: But the main purpose of the theory is not to explain ESP, is it?

    YOUNG: No. Rather it tries to account for consciousness and the evolution of life from non-living forms. The theory constitutes a reinterpretation of science in order to update it and incorporate within it the finding of quantum physics which, though discovered by Max Planck at the turn of the century, are still not widely recognized. This is important because science is no longer the determinist system it used to be.

    CBird: Where can this knowledge be applied?

    YOUNG: In medicine and psychology, for instance. These professions are still based on the assumptions of an obsolete classical determinism in physics which the new discoveries of quantum physics have rendered obsolete. They leave out purposeful intention.

    The usual interpretation of science does not provide for consciousness. Science, unlike religious thought, proclaims itself unconcerned with final issues or with first cause. This interpretation has invaded other areas, particularly psychology and other social and human sciences.

    But how can there be a valid science of man if it doesn’t recognize first cause which, in fact, is the touchstone of man’s behavior inspiring all his works, goals and responsibilities to his fellows? In jurisprudence, the question of guilt depends on recognition that a person can be first cause.

    CBird: Your model offers one the opportunity to break out of the prison of a person’s set beliefs and contemplate the cosmos from a fresh viewpoint.

    YOUNG: Yes. Despite the indifference of the grand cosmic scheme to intellectual dogmas, or new models for that matter, a new model is nevertheless of importance in getting people to let go of their belief systems to which they cling as sailors to their ship which they will abandon only when it is sinking. It is belief systems which have burned witches and caused wars and, in our day, put people who have developed cancer cures in jail. The inquisition came, grotesquely, into being to stamp out belief in immortality.

    CBird: That being the case, the inquisition lives on, though in a different guise. Do you foresee an abrupt change in the way man views the cosmos?

    YOUNG: It must come about because our culture, our whole educational system and our philosophies are products of the scientific method which is turning out to be false in principle.

    CBird: In what way?

    YOUNG: It is not only that the public is becoming increasingly aware that the industrial age, with all its technology and materialism, is plundering and poisoning and polluting the planet. More important, science itself is encountering problems which can only be resolved by abandoning sacred notions of objectivity and determinism. I have tried to embed a foreign intrusion — like the grain of sand in the oyster which ultimately produces the pearl — into rationalism. This intrusion is the paradox of life.

    CBird: When did you first begin developing your theory?

    YOUNG: While at Princeton in 1921, I first heard about Einstein and wanted to understand his theory of relatively which seemed so strange to my contemporaries. I was a mathematics major. No course on relativity was offered so I requested one. It was created by Oswald Veblen, one of the top American mathematicians and a cousin of the writer Thorstein. I was the sole student. Though I liked Veblen personally I didn’t like relativity because it was mostly rate learning of the symbolic convention which is a way of writing a whole lot of equations very quickly. I wanted to know what it meant but Veblen said, “Don’t try to understand it, just learn it.” It was because of the inadequacy I felt in the theory of relativity that I began to construct my own theory of the universe in keeping with the spirit of those days. I at first thought it possible to explain the universe CBird: Why?

    YOUNG: Because structure is a system of relationships that exist simultaneously. The relativity theory, too, was an attempt to map the universe as a fixed immutable entity, as if it existed all at once. All at once, because time was made a dimension. But almost as soon as I started, I ran up against a difficulty.

    I realized that a theory of structure cannot do justice to the content of time, that time was not just another dimension. Time is basically asymmetrical. To go into the future is different from going into the past. We can’t go into the past. It’s like going to Chicago and then coming back again. We are carried into the future. Time is irreversible and cumulative. It doesn’t flow in either direction as space does.

    CBird: How did your theory differ from the theory of relativity?

    YOUNG: Of course, relatively included time as a fourth dimension. But it still referred to the “structure” of space-time which I felt overlooked a vital characteristic distinguishing time from space its asymmetry and one-wayness.

    CBIRD: What first attracted your attention to the idea of symmetry versus asymmetry?

    YOUNG: During a course in Chinese art I was particularly taken with the evolution of the old bronzes which go back to 2,500 BC and evolve in shape as one proceeds through the Han period and the other dynasties which follow. I noticed that an insistence on symmetry took place when this art was beginning to deteriorate instead of symmetrical shapes made by a number of bends in the outline of a vase a pure sine curve came into being, perfectly symmetrical but empty of content — which doesn’t say anything. It might be decorative but it doesn’t carry any meaning, any force. The same kind of curve, known as the Hogarth line of beauty, was introduced in the West also at a time when formal art was becoming exhausted. It came to me that the false appeal of symmetry questionably valid in art might be misleading in a theory of the universe and completely erroneous in the treatment of time because it disregards time’s narrow or one-wayness.

     

    CBIRD: How did you further develop your theory while in college?

    YOUNG: I couldn’t. At that point I went in a different direction. I decided I should concentrate on problems to which the answers could be tested. So I turned to invention. After a few false starts I began to work on the problem of the helicopter which at that time had a long history of failure and clearly needed a solution. I came across the work of Anton Flettner, a German inventor, who used rotating cylinders as masts, instead of sails, for boat propulsion. The rotation caused the boat to behave like a sailboat but one didn’t need to lower the “sails” in a storm. In one of Flettner’s books I saw pictures of a windmill with little propellers on the ends of the blades and it occurred to me tat one might use this principle for a helicopter. It turned out to be a mistaken idea. I wasted over ten years on the wrong design, although it wasn’t all waste. I learned a lot, but the design was too complicated. In 1938 I went to my first conference on rotor winged aircraft. These included autogyros which did not become successful. They could not compete with fixed-winged aircraft because they couldn’t go fast enough and they couldn’t compete with helicopters because they couldn’t hover.

    CBIRD:What led you to a breakthrough?

    YOUNG: Progress came when I began building fly models much smaller than the one I had been working on. I found that small models made along conventional lines were highly unstable. This was my first real discovery. Up to then, it had never occurred to me a helicopter could be unstable. Because these models were small and could be quickly repaired, I could test them to destruction and try out various ideas. I had to provide stability.

    CBIRD: Then the essential problem was one of stability.

    YOUNG: That’s it. The first thing I tried was to get rid of swings with a pendulum device. What made a helicopter deviate from perfect hovering was that, if the rotor tips, then it would start dashing off to one side. The pendulum didn’t work. I tried other things, without success. But I was getting close. I knew I had a creepy feeling.

    BIRD: What kind of feeling exactly?

    YOUNG: As if I were walking around a corner and expecting something peculiar to happen. Even the slightest sound made me jumpy. The first time it happened, the air felt super-saturated I was so sure my idea was going to work that I asked my patent attorney to witness the first flight. He gave up several appointments and drove a considerable distance. My model was ready to go. Almost ceremoniously I got it started. It took off and immediately turned upside down and crashed. My lawyer was so disgusted he swore to never come back for any more model demonstrations. That was the end of his association with me.

    Two or three days later the real thing came through to me. The preliminary brainwave was a false alarm. I believe it was because I was anticipating the real thing.

    CBIRD: What was it?

    YOUNG: A stabilization bar, a hinged bar with weights on the ends. The bar governed a plate which in turn governing the rotor. The bar *?* even when the helicopter accelerated. The next step was to develop remote controls so I could fly the model whenever I wanted.

    CBIRD: Meanwhile World War was at hand?

    YOUNG: Yes, and the draft board was breathing down my neck. I appealed to the National Inventors Council but they didn’t help. Then I took my model out to Wright Air Force Filed in Ohio. It impressed a Colonel Gregory enough for him to compose a telegram promising me a contract. That exempted me from the draft. I finished work on the model.

    CBIRD: How did you make a deal with Bell aircraft?

    YOUNG: I had a friend, a doctor of medicine, who also designed complicated gears. One of them could change the compression rate of airplane engines. I suggested to him that Bell might be interested in his invention because to me, they had the sexiest looking fighter, the Airacobra, which was later supplied in quantity to the Russians. When he was at Bell, he told them of my helicopter design.

    They invited me to come to their plant in Buffalo, New York. I put my model in a suitcase and went up there. The guard wouldn’t let me through the gate because he thought there was a bomb in the suitcase. I flew the model right there in the factory between the Aircobras. I assigned my patents to bell and stayed with them until 1947 dealing with the horrendous * complexities of getting the thing into production.

     

     

    CBIRD: Didn’t the war urgency help?

    YOUNG: Not at all. The Pentagon knew nothing about it. Bell was concentrating on building fighter aircraft. But Larry Bell, the president, was a man of vision. He wanted something for his people to make after the war. It wasn’t the helicopter that was unique but my idea of the stabilization device. Sikorsky, for instance, was ahead of me with his helicopter. He had a different configuration. There were many other helicopter companies which did not survive. Platt Lepage won the first army contract to build a helicopter. I sold Larry Bell on the stability question and he bought that.

    CBIRD: During this time were you still developing your theory of *provess?

    YOUNG: my nineteen years on the helicopter problem never erased my interest in the theory of process. For one thing, I noted that there was a fundamental difference between the method of a scientist and the method of an inventor. Though both are concerned with the laws of nature, the scientist, once having discovered a law, holds it sacred. The inventor discovers laws but his goal is to apply them. This involves a change in direction. A law is restrictive. It limits the possible. But it can be turned about to provide the means for achieving an end. Think of the carpenter who, planing a board, discovers that he is working against the rain and turns the board around.

    CBIRD: How did this relate to your theory?

    YOUNG: It’s a question of attitude. The attitude of learning how to use a law instead of being *continged by it led to my conceiving of law, or determinism, as the agency of free will rather than its antagonist. This was fundamental to the theory of process since, as my books show, process must create determinism to acquire the means to achieve its goal.

    Without purpose, without goal-directed activity, my helicopter could not have evolved. For me this was a lesson in how evolution works. The purpose creates the machine. From the fact that no machine will disclose its purpose unless assembled and in operation, it should be easy to infer that man — widely considered in science to be a machine — cannot be understood by an examination of physical body alone. The tendency of *philosophers and scientist to talk of man as a mere mechanism — intending but this to imply he is without purpose — shows a lack of understanding of machines as well as of man.

    So I again took up my theory of process, not only for its emphasis on time, but for the presence implicit in *porvess of a *purposiveness that pushes toward the attainment of a goal.

    Another thing I learned had to do with a crazy idea for a machine which would compose music. The music would play backwards just as well as forwards. There was something wrong. Again, it was the symmetry problem. A real piece of music, I realized, wouldn’t act like this. It had to integrate as it proceeded, each phrase being built out of what preceded it. This brought me to the idea that the scientific method wouldn’t always work. It was too static. It didn’t have a built-in integration mechanism.

    CBIRD: What else?
    YOUNG: All this was linked to the problem of converting a factory making airplanes to one making helicopters. It was no small problem. Something like getting a mouse to eat a mountain. Bell told me “You tell us what to do.” But it didn’t work that easily. The whole plant had to be inculcated with a new philosophy. I remember one *engineer at Bell who put his finger on the nub of the problem when he said: “The trouble is that the modeling clay is full of nuts and bolts.” The day-to-day efforts of solving the problem in the face of so much inertia was emotionally draining. I took to writing my feelings and thoughts down in a journal. All this caused me to delve into philosophy and metaphysics. I took up Yoga at this time.

    CBIRD: With a guru or by yourself?

    YOUNG: At first, by myself. I preferred the physical Yoga to start. When I got into meditative Yoga, I was introduced to my first psychic experiences. I noticed that when I tried to make my mind blank, I could only achieve the blankness for about five minutes before a thought would intrude. Keeping track of my *mediation, I recorded all the interrupting thoughts. Imagine my surprise when I discovered *ta thtye often turned out to be experiences I had later that day. By concentrating, I was picking up precognitive images.

    It was disturbing to my scientific training and increased my determination to search for the meaning of consciousness.

     

     

    CBIRD: how did you begin your quest into consciousness and man’s real purpose?

    YOUNG: when I married for the second time, I told my new wife, Ruth, that I wanted to investigate the consciousness problem. For the next five years we traveled extensively looking into all kinds of psychic phenomena.

    CBIRD: What purpose did you conceive for the Foundation for the Study of Consciousness?

    YOUNG: Since there were so many unexplained phenomena, like ESP, which did not fit into the current framework of knowledge and therefore remained undigested, it was time to prod people into thinking seriously about them. The main purpose for the foundation was to build a comprehensive theory in which ESP could be integrated into existing scientific knowledge.

    Soon after I set up the foundation I met Dr. Andrija Puharich through the well-known psychic, Eileen Garrett, with whom he was working. Puharich had established his own Round Table Foundation in Camden, Maine. He was about to be drafted into military service and asked me if I would take care of his foundation in his absence. That’s a whole story in itself.

    In New York City, we worked with various psychics, including Frances Farrelly, who had worked extensively in the investigation of radionics, and Francis Marion, a *psychometrist who wrote the book, In my Mind’s Eye.

    CBIRD: Where did all this research lead you?

    YOUNG: With Farrelly it led to my recognition of the importance of intention. We found that the various wiring systems for radionics instruments, or whether they were properly connected, didn’t play an important role in the radionics process. What mattered most was the operator’s intention. In diagnosis of disease, she was tuning in on the patient’s condition and using her own organism to respond. The instrument was only a device to assist concentration.

    CBIRD: And with Marion?

    YOUNG: With Marion, we found that his psychometric readings — of messages in sealed envelopes, for example — clearly did not depend on some sort of x-ray vision. Because it did not matter to Marion whether a message was written in a language completely unknown to him, he was primarily detecting, not the letters and the words, but the meaning of what was written.

    CBIRD: In his book, Uri, Puharich mentioned that you were present when Dr. D.G. Vinod, a Hindu scholar and sage from India, was receiving messages, including mathematical formulae while in trance. What influence did this have on your thinking?

    YOUNG: I was far more impressed by the poetry that came through Vinod than the science. In fact, I recall my annoyance that the “guides” were employing a concept, so often used by psychics of “higher dimensions” to explain psychic phenomena. To me this was just as much an evasion as, say, explaining radionics by reference to radio. If I were influenced at all, it was toward pushing me in the opposite direction.

    CBIRD: How so?

    YOUNG: The idea that we can get to another place by “traveling” in some extra dimension is a misconception because positions in space are separated only because of the dimensions of space. To create another dimension to connect them won’t work. Things that are separated are brought together by removing the space between them, not by creating another space.

    In other words, dimensions are constraints. It is by removing them, rather than by adding to them, that one may explain, for example, the ability to diagnose the ailments of a person a thousand miles distant. Space may not exist for the psyche as it does for the body.

    CBIRD: But wouldn’t that put psychic phenomena beyond the pale of science?

    YOUNG: That’s the interesting part. Even in so-called science you have upsetting findings about light. Take the famous experiment proposed by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen. It was performed over a decade ago and has been extensively debated but its implications are only beginning to sink in.

    CBIRD: Would you describe the experiment?

    YOUNG: The experiment demonstrates that two light beams emitted in opposite directions from a common source “keep in touch with each other” in a way that cannot be explained by current theory. If the experimenter does something to one beam at a distance from the source, such as to polarize it by passing it through a prism, the other light beam acts as if it knew what happened to its partner. Though proposed to show up a fallacy in quantum theory, the negative result anticipated by Einstein and his colleagues did not occur. The only colleagues did not occur. The only explanation is that light somehow “knows its own future.” The implication is that signals — but not necessarily energy — exceeding the speed of light must traverse the intervening space. Physicists call the phenomenon by the innocuous sounding name of “non-locally.”

    CBIRD: Did your theory anticipate this result?

    YOUNG: Yes. In the 1950s I was beginning to think of telepathy and radionics as what is now called “non-local.” I recall my using the illustration of a person, sought by the police, whose “Wanted” photograph is posted. The person’s guilt, real or assumed is a question of principle and principles don’t have to travel. I was looking for scientific evidence of this kind of existence, an existence not subject to the constraints of spatial location or even — in the case of precognition, dreams or predictions — to the constraints of time.

    CBIRD: What other grounds did you have for suggesting a hypothesis about entities not being subject to space or time?

    YOUNG: The answer may surprise. As I was building my theory of process, it only occurred to me that process itself involves a precise number of stages when I began to compare ancient myths that describe how the universe comes into existence. Many of them showed this to take place in seven stages. In Genesis, for instance, God makes the universe in six days and rests on the seventh. The ancient Hindu tradition insists on seven-ness. I thus had a clue, perhaps a directive, that process involves seven stages.

    CBIRD: What else shored up this idea?

    YOUNG: A difficult book, The Mahalma Letters, by Alfred Percy Sinnett who claimed to have received them from one of the masters who inspired the theosophical tradition. It was explicit on the subject of seven stages of evolution. The author referred to the known animal, vegetable and mineral kingdoms to which he added a kingdom beyond animal and three more preceding mineral. He said he could not deal with these because science did not yet know of their existence.

    CBIRD: But you *dealt with them.

    YOUNG: Yes, since the book was written in the early 1880s I surmised that the subsequent findings of science might provide identification of the three pre-mineral kingdoms. Since minerals are composed of molecules, the mineral kingdom had to be molecular. Since molecules are formed from atoms, atoms had to constitute the premolecular kingdom and particles which form atoms the kingdom prior to atoms.

    CBIRD: What about the first kingdom?

    YOUNG: At first I called it sub-nuclear. Only later did I realize it must be light. Itself without mass, light can create particles which have mass. Light has no charge. The particles created by it have charge. Light is not seen, it is seeing. For a pulse of light, the photon, time does not exist. Thus mass and hence energy as well as time are born from the photon, from light which is therefore the first kingdom, the first stage of the process that engenders the universe.

    CBIRD: And the last, the seventh stage?

    YOUNG: I call it “Dominion.” Man would be one manifestation of this stage. Man is at a critical point. He is more than the beasts in that he is in a different kingdom but not very far along in it. He may be at its midpoint, like the claim in the animal kingdom, and, like the clam, he is buried in the sand with only a dim consciousness of worlds beyond. But he has a long way to go. There is no upper limit to his evolution.

    CBIRD: Do you think that science will ever accept psychic phenomena?
    YOUNG: As a matter of fact, I find it difficult to discover what law of science denies telepathy, precognition and other ESP phenomena. It is, rather, with alleged implications of the laws of science that such phenomena conflict. This prevalent attitude on the part of scientists is against the interests of true science and is even contrary to elementary justice for it becomes impossible to correct a theory by experimental test as long as theory decrees in advance what the outcome of the test must be.

    CBIRD: Psychologists in many countries will have nothing to do with parapsychology or psychic phenomena the very existence of which they deny.

    YOUNG: Psychologists maintain that phantasms arise in the unconscious. But where and what is the unconscious? What is the substance from which vivid hallucinations are formed? To call them unreal or to say that they arise in the unconscious does not explain them.

    CBIRD: How do we know we are not “unconscious” in a so-called normal waking sate?

    YOUNG: Well, what do we know of how prevalent hallucinatory imagings may be in ordinary daily life. Normal perception is loaded with second level images or illusions. I see across the street the back of a fascinating female creature, quicken my steps to catch a closer glimpse. As I get closer, or see her turn to look in a store window. I see that my imagination has played me false. The girl is homely.

    Or again, we are informed by psychologists that the newborn chick does not really have a true perception of its mother. It will follow any object such as an automated football. This deduction may satisfy the psychologists’ instinct for mechanical explanations, but for me it rather suggests that “mother” is a subjective idea, an archetype of the chick world and that this archetype exists prior to the training or sense experience which will eventually make its contribution, but subsequent to what is subjective, archetypal, or what I call projective.

    CBIRD: Your view of cosmology, with its four levels lays a foundation on which to base theories of ESP and other psychic phenomena.

    YOUNG: In a way **Telepathy, clairvoyance and map dowsing have a second-level nature since these phenomena do not show the usual dependence on distance. They all behave as if there were no intervening space between the percipient and the target. This is exactly what I would expect of the second **leel where a space does not exist. Recall that it is not possible to attribute a precise position to a nuclear particle. On the other hand, precognition could be assigned to level one because, in this case, there is no time. Above all, level one establishes a basis for intention, important not only for parapsychological matters, but in life situations in general.

    CBIRD: Why do people have so much difficulty in understanding your projective levels. I noticed that at your seminar last evening two psychologists in the group were unhappy about what you said about “first cause.”

    YOUNG: This is because purpose, the equivalent of first cause, is ruled out in science which has ***decreed that what it is dealing with is the how rather than the why.

    But when you get to life, then science must learn to rise above determinism, mechanism. You can’t treat life as a machine. In contemporary medicine, the current philosophy has been to treat symptoms but now some doctors are beginning to realize that a lot of disease is self-induced. It’s a question of the patient’s intention. Here is where the fact of intention could materially change science. I won’t say that it would change the manufacture of autos or clocks or washing machines, although in particle physics determinism is becoming suspect. Perhaps the physicists themselves are creating some of the new particles.

    CBIRD: In your lectures at the institute are you offering your audience a new way to approach the world?

    YOUNG: When I first tackled the problem of ESP I hoped to be able to lift a veil of ignorance behind which we are forced to operate. I now am beginning to think that the veil is rather useful because it makes people think and work for themselves. It’s no use solving other people’s problems.

    CBIRD: Perhaps much of psychology, in its insistence in reducing people to a norm, misses that point; it refuses to see tat everyone is here for a purpose.

    YOUNG: In my self-defense, I don’t think my effort is aimed at solving problems. Shakespeare held that “All Life’s a Stage.” But on our present stage, the boards are rotting and the players are falling through them. I am trying to build a new stage so they will have something more solid to walk upon.

    Science has lost its meaning. It doesn’t answer questions. It doesn’t interest people, even those who go into it. I know many physicists who have dropped out of physics through sheer boredom. The young people today can’t depend on this tottering science. They become insecure. Insecure people return to simple animal needs. There is no culture possible in the absence of this kind of security.

    CBIRD: Are you trying to offer security?

    YOUNG: There’s no question of that. I’m trying to open new doors. But many people, however puzzled, are afraid to pass through. The security they seek is endorsement. I hate to stress this because I would like to encourage people to think for themselves. But ours is still a religious culture. The religion now happens to be science, even though its priests are corrupted and its church falling into ruin. We have not left the Christian age — the astrologers would call it the Age of Pisces – we continue to be enmeshed in the old belief system.

     

     

    CBIRD: Do you think that science should be swept away, then?

    YOUNG: Certainly not. I wouldn’t want the edifice of science to come crashing down as in an earthquake. The French and Russian revolutions destroyed more than they created. The history of revolution shows that instead of replacing tyrannical government by a better one, the government gets more tyrannical.

    But the academic establishment has been behaving atrociously. Instead of welcoming a wave of new knowledge as it did at the turn of the century, instead of hosting new talent, it turns and flees.

     

     

    “The Buddhists teach how to escape from the wheel, but I rather think they mean we should escape from endless repetitions of the same cycle. Each new cycling should be a new adventure, incorporating, not repeating, what has gone before.” The Geometry of Meaning

     

     

    “At no time has it been suggested, either by quantum theory or advocates of free will, that the laws of nature be set aside. No one is advocating causelessness. For it is precisely because free will occurs in an orderly universe that it can have far-reaching effects. If my will says ‘Forward!’ and my legs are paralyzed, nothing happens. If the captain gives an order but the crew stages a mutiny, the captain’s will is ineffectual. So we must see the problem not as free will versus determinism, but as free will plus determinism.” The Geometry of Meaning

     

     

     

    “We have not attempted to find sanction for this overall thesis from science, mainly because current science does not recognize the positive role of uncertainty in cosmology. Science, in fact, has become so fragmented into separate disciplines that it has lost sight of the unifying principle that the world ‘universe’ implies.” The Reflexive Universe

     

     

     

    “Cosmology remains awe-inspiring despite efforts to wrap it up, and the moral is: don’t trust the limited boundaries which the rational mind uses to protect itself. Don’t permit statistical law to give the illusion that there is nothing here but us chickens.” The Reflexive Universe

     

     

    Sitting in

    Chris Bird with Arthur Young

     

    Arthur Middleton young seemed dwarfed by piles of books and articles surrounding his armchair when I arrived for a two-day visit at his apartment in The Institute for the Study of Consciousness in Berkeley, California. His wife, Ruth, sat at the living-room table putting final editorial touches and pasting countless illustrations into a dozen sets of page-proofs for Arthur’s forthcoming pair of books.

    The scholarly atmosphere was misleading for the man who heaved himself, smiling, to his feet, has the open candor of an outdoorsman and the quick wit of a good nightclub comedian.

    During the next forty-eight hours I was able to appreciate the depth and breadth of an inventor-philosopher not only during the interview itself which, by the time it was over, could have filled the pages of a small book but by listening to his conversation with visiting physicists, mathematicians, poets and plain seekers-of-knowledge and hearing him give a two-hour evening seminar on his theory of process in the institute’s meting-room.

    The qualities which most strongly embellish Arthur’s always serious repartee are those of humor and patience. He was never annoyed when I, or another, seemed unable to follow his train of thought. Arthur as a way, like Socrates, of pulling his interiocutor into a quicksand of self-inquiry, then rescuing him with his gift of metaphor.

    There is much of a child’s inquisitivenss and playfulness in Arthur which I have encountered in other inventors. His present project – the correlation of famous people’s horoscopes with radiesthesia-derived indices of brain power – is taking him as did the invention of the Bell helicopter and his investigation of the psychic would, years of effort.

    I left with the feeling that Arthur was and *is, ever the pioneer.

     

    Biography

    Arthur Middleton Young was born in 1905 in Paris where his father, brought up in a farming milieu in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, had come with his wife to pursue their mutual interest in painting. One of their neighbors in Giverney was the impressionist master, Claude Monet. Young recalls that his father used to recount how Monet would paint a scene of water lilies, then get angry and throw his easel, paints and brushes into the lily pond from which they would be fished out by his daughters so the artist could begin his task anew.

    The family returned to Jenkintown, Pennsylvania, where Arthur was raised in an old 18th century farm, Meadow Bank. He enjoyed an idyllic childhood.

    At the Haverford School near Philadelphia, young, who was forever making things, became known as an expert * gadgeteer. “I loved to construct complicated devices,” he recalls. “I remember once I made a crane from “Mecano Set” parts which would lift one of my little brothers into the air with the help of a motor and endless pulleys. I also made the electric motor. That was my initiation into the electrical field.

    For several years his machine building and ham-radio hobby absorbed his life. School was a minor activity by comparison. His first course was physics which was easy because he had already read most of the physics text on his own. This led to violent arguments with his physics teacher.

    Young went to college at Princeton where, as he puts it, he acquired very little education. He did what he pleased which was mainly reading books in mathematics and physics. He later turned to the arts, becoming intrigued with a course in Oriental Art largely because of its philosophical overtones. It was at this time that Young was introduced to Zen Buddhism and other Eastern schools of thought.

    Young says that, toward the end of his Princeton studies, he dropped science for painting and studying Eastern philosophy. “I even tried to achieve nirvana,” he recollects. “I would lie on my cot, night and day, and try to make myself indifferent to everything. The alarming thing, in retrospect, is that I almost succeeded. I didn’t care about anything.”

    Snapping out of this mood, young passed through a series of quasi-creative phases. At first he planned to make a movie in which to quote him, “words, such as those of a poem, would jump and dance.” He was living at the time in Pennsylvania in the heart of the coal-mining district in his grandmother’s laundry Young built machinery to make words “dance and jump,” but soon became more interested in machines than in the movie.

    His first attempt at invention was for a machine which could fly to Mars. “That shows how dumb I was,” he says, “even though I’d graduated from college.” The idea was based on a new type of wing which would have a constant lift and a drag which would not increase with the speed so that could move faster and faster. “After a year of this, I went to the library and plunged into the study of aerodynamics and discovered my error,” says Arthur. In the libraries Young became interested in the helicopter and the real number of people who had tried to make them even back in the early 1900s before the airplane had taken wing. Starting in 1928, he worked for over a decade to solve the problem of making a helicopter fly and in 1941 licensed his patents to Bell Aircraft young remained with Bell for several more years to work out production problems for the helicopter during and following World War II. In 1946 young’s helicopter, Bell Model 47, was awarded the world’s first commercial helicopter license.

    During his college days, young was also preoccupied with the study of the theory of relativity. Certain deficiencies in this theory led him to construct his own model of the universe, a task upon which he continued to work after leaving Bell in 1947. His early interest in oriental systems of thought combined with stress encountered in his work at Bell led him to the practice of Yoga and to his first psychic experiences.

    After divorce and remarriage, Young traveled extensively with his new wife, Ruth, to investigate unexplained phenomena all connected to seemingly unusual powers of the mind. He came tot he belief that consciousness had to be made basic in the theory of the universe he was working out.

    This led, in 1952, to young’s establishing the Foundation for the Study of Consciousness in Philadelphia and in 1968 to his launching the Journal for the Study of Consciousness, published until 1971 and edited by Dr. Charles Muses. In 1972, Young and Charles Muses brought out a book, Consciousness and Reality, the Human Pivot Point.

    For the past two years Young and his wife have divided their time between their farm in *Dowingtown, Pennsylvania, and their home in Berkeley, California, which also houses the Institute for the Study of Consciousness.

    In 1976, the simultaneous publication of Young’s two books. The Reflexive Universe and The Geometry of Meaning (*Delacorte Press/Seymour Lawrence) crowned half a century of his struggle to understand the true meaning of existence.

     

    chris

    Chris Bird 1995

    #3200
    EKEK
    Keymaster

    Radionics “Black Box”

     

    The father of this movement was Dr. Albert Abrams, a professor of pathology at Stanford University’s medical school. Basing his discoveries on the philosophy that all matter radiates information that can be detected by his instruments in conjunction with the unconscious reflexes of another human being, Abrams succeeded in attracting a large following and also arousing the unremitting ire of the medical and scientific establishment. Thousands of self-professed healers were effecting cures, making diagnoses, and even removing pests from gardens merely by twisting dials, swinging pendulums, or rubbing their fingers across strange devices., The following passage describes the use of one such instrument known as the Delawarr machine:

    Suppose that it is required to find out the condition of a patient’s liver. We place a bloodspot or saliva sample in one of the two containers at the top of the main panel, according to whether the patient is male or female, and start turning the tuning knob slowly, passing the fingers of the right hand over the rubber detector at the same time with a series of “brushing” strokes until a “stick” is obtained. The patient’s bloodspot is then tuned into the set.

    The stick refers to a particular rubbing sensation in the finger. The location of the dials when the “stick” occurs, when properly translated is said to indicate the diagnosis of the disease. When the disease is tuned in to the instrument, the cure can be “broadcast” over any distance, to the patient.

    Other radionic developments are said to have been even more startling, such as the camera developed by the Los Angeles chiropractor, Ruth Drown. Using nothing but a drop of blood, it is claimed that this camera could take pictures of the organs and tissues of patients-sometimes at a distance of thousands of miles. She also claimed to take pictures in “cross-section” a feat that cannot be duplicated even with X-rays. While she received a British patent for her apparatus, Drown was persecuted as a charlatan by the FDA.

    A story about Drown’s ability is told by the cosmologist Arthur M. Young, who invented the Bell helicopter:

    Ruth Drown was truly an angelic sort of a person–if you can imagine an angel in the flesh. She started reeling off these Pythagorean relationships that just made my mind spin. I couldn’t keep up with her.

    It wasn’t on the first occasion, but maybe on the second, that I wanted to put her to a test. I was at that time having a toothache. So I asked her if she would diagnose my condition and take a photograph. But I didn’t tell her anything. And she took these photographs that were about eight by ten. It looked like a very detailed picture of teeth.

    She put the film in this box, but there were no lenses or anything like that. Whatever this radiation was, it exposed the film. It was not done with light. And she got a photograph of the tooth.

    Being scientific in nature, I said, “Now do it again.” This was all in the dark. She couldn’t see me. So I pressed the tooth hard with my finger to make it hurt more, to see what would happen. The next picture was an enlargement of this same tooth.

    Today there are two developments effecting the standing of radionics. On the one hand, researchers in a new area dubbed psychotronics are taking a serious interest in understanding the possible mechanisms such instrumentation might have., In fact, several new radionics devices have recently been manufactured with computerized components. At the time of this writing, there is no clear indication that such new devices represent any genuine advance in the arcane art of radionics. There is no reason to suspect that a major breakthrough is at hand. On the other hand, a number of radionic practitioners and investigators have reported that after becoming proficient in the use of the “black boxes,” they were able to obtain the same effects without them.,

    One radionics expert, Frances Farrelly, demonstrated her ability to work without her instrument at the International Conference on Psychotronics in Prague in 1973:

    …she was confronted by a professor from the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences who gave her a chip of mineralized rock and asked her before a large audience if she could state its origin and age. Rubbing the table before her to get a radionic type “stick,” Farrelly, after putting a dozen questions to herself, stated that the mineral in question came from a meteor and was about 3,200,000 years old, answers which exactly matched the most considered conclusions of expert Czech mineralogists.

    It was her contention she had learned to “run the instrument in [her] head.” Perhaps, then, the “black box” is to radionics what the pencil is to arithmetic — a tool for focusing consciousness within the structure of a disciplined system.

     

    Interview: A leading radionic medical diagnostician for doctor’s clients discusses her decades of research and experience with the “black boxes” of radionics, as well as her own sensitivity.

    Radionics Authority Frances Farrelly

    By Christopher Bird

    Psychic Magazine – July/August 1975

     

    CBird: How do you describe yourself?

    FARRELLY: I am a retired medical technician using my psychic abilities for diagnosis of health conditions. As reported in Dr. Karagulia’s (a M.D.) book Breakthrough to Creativity — I am referred to in it as the clairsentient, “Kay” — I am clairvoyant and clairsentient, and I have had many precognitive experiences.

    For example, there have been three instances in which I foresaw the wreck of the train on which I had been traveling. I got off at the next stop, while later down the track the wreck occurred. One of these was while I was in Paris ready to board a train when I got a very clear impression. “You must not travel on this train,” that came through both times I attempted to board it, so I took the next one. Later we were stopped because the train ahead had been wrecked — the one I would have been on. In each case I did not get a mental image of the wreck, but rather I just sensed it or had an urgent feeling to get out of the way of danger.

    As a clairsentient, which is my most developed ability, I am able to pick up the physical and emotional feelings of individuals, which tells me exactly what’s bothering them. I use it in my diagnostic work with doctors.

    CBird: When were you first aware of these abilities in yourself?

    FARRELLY: At the time of the influenza epidemic during World War I, when I was six years old, I made myself a little Red Cross uniform and went round to our sick neighbors. I’d rub their heads and their symptoms would disappear. When they informed my mother, she retorted, down-to-earth Vermonter that she was: “Don’t admit it to her, for God’s sake! She’s crazy enough as it is.” So I didn’t really know I had any healing ability until I was over forty when I was first introduced to other healers and the practice of laying-on-of-hands.

    CBird: Were there any other psychic experiences as a child?

    FARRELLY: Well, I could see little nature spirits in the woods. They were similar to what I learned later were called leprechauns in Irish stories. We had a flower-collecting contest in elementary school. All the children were sent out to collect wild flowers and got points for the number of varieties they could find. I won the contest each year, starting from the first grade, with the help of my little friends. Finally, in the fourth grade, my teacher asked me how it was that I’d won the contest three years running. I told her honestly that my friends told me where to find the flowers. She asked, “What friends?” And I told her about the little people I played and talked with and that they’re around all the time. I mentioned how they often walked to school with me and then waited and walked home with me. The teacher smiled and said she’d like to go along and see what happened next time.

    So one morning, one of these . . . you could call them elves . . . told me he could show me a place in the woods where there was a rare white lady slipper. There had been lots of pink lady slippers in our area, but I’d never seen a white one. All excited, I asked my elfin friend if my teacher could come along and he agreed. He led us about two miles from the school to a part of the woods I had never visited before. As we walked along, my little friend played games. He’d walk along the top of rail fences for instance.

    CBird: What was your teacher’s reaction to being led by your little guide?

    FARRELLY: She couldn’t see him but she seemed to accept my running account of what he was doing. He led us right up to a gorgeous white lady slipper.

    Delighted he’d been true to his word, I turned, beaming at my teacher. Her response was unexpected. She suddenly grabbed me and began shaking me and slapping my face. She told me that I was a liar and a cheat and that I’d known all along that the white flower was where it was.

    As hurt as I was, it was nothing compared to the fright I felt when the teacher said she would report the incident to my mother. I’d had several confrontations with my mother from about the age of eight about my fancied play with “little people.” At first, she made light of it but then she told me with great severity that it was all in my “imagination” and it was time to forget about it. She began punishing me whenever she caught me talking to my friends.

    When the teacher told my mother about the white lady slipper, I got a nasty licking with a switch and was told there’d be more if I was ever again caught talking to the little people. Although I continued to see them for a couple of years more, I never told anybody.

    CBird: What did they look like?

    FARRELLY: Lovely and elfish. They were dressed in little costumes, and were about six to eight inches tall. They’d speak to me in good English, but with high-pitched squeaky voices. After I saw Geoffry Hodson’s books on the little people, I was amazed to learn that someone had actually written seriously about what I’d seen as a child.

    CBird: When did you first get involved in the unusual diagnostic and healing technology known as “Radionics?”

    FARRELLY: When I was operating the Approved Laboratories in St. Petersburg, Florida, doing milk and water analysis for the state. It was straight chemistry, bacteriology, hematology. One day Dr. Robert Love, an osteopath, who described himself as an “electronic physician,” called me to analyze some milk samples for bacterial count and undulant fever. I found it strange that he wanted all his samples back since, generally, we just poured them down the sink after the testing.

    CBird: Why did he want them back?

    FARRELLY: I found out when I took them to his office. He had a large desk covered with Leeds and Northrop rheostats. He told me to sit down and he’d check my findings on his milk samples. He picked up a sample bottle and put it on a metal plate. After turning some dials on a box-like machine, he rubbed his fingers on a wooden plate attached to it and told me that sample number 16 was negative.

    I checked my list of findings. Number 16 was negative.

    He took up the next sample. After a few seconds rubbing, he said that it was very bad. My finding on the sample read “Four plus,” which indicated very bad. He went through the complete collection and his almost instant findings accorded exactly with all the ones it had taken me the whole night to make.

    CBird: What was your reaction?

    FARRELLY: I thought he could have been reading my mind. So I asked him if he could identify some samples I could bring him from my lab. I selected about five, as I remember, one a slide of a piece of liver section with a spirochete of syphilis in it. Another was a sample of lymphatic leukemia for which I had counted the white blood cells myself that same morning.

    I gave him the sample unlabeled. While he did his testing I went into an adjoining room and kept my mind off what he was doing and the specimens by reciting poetry to myself. When I came out he told me his analyses. Each one was 100% correct. Of the leukemia specimen he told me that he couldn’t get over the white count in this person. He got over 190,000 white cells, which seemed to him impossible. But that very morning I had counted them in the lab at 192,000 — 5 to 10,000 is normal. I was astonished. Dr. Love seemed to be able to make accurate analyses as fast as one could dial telephone numbers.

    CBird: That was the beginning?

    FARRELLY: Yes. I asked him if I could try his machine. He showed me what to do. If my fingers stuck when rubbing across the plate, the answer was yes. If they traveled freely over the plate, it was no. I seemed to have the talent. I became very excited. I made a bargain with him to train me in the technique in return for my doing lab tests on any unusual specimens for a year.

    CBird: Did you learn how Dr. Love’s mysterious instrument functioned?

    FARRELLY: No, he would never show me how his instruments were made. Then I heard of Dr. Ruth Drown in Pasadena, California. I contacted her, went out there, and took a course with her. There was so much rivalry in this field among practitioners about “who had stolen what from whom.” Dr. Drown, for instance, detested Love and didn’t want his name mentioned.

    Dr. Drown had a “camera” which worked at a distance. She showed me how to operate it. But she seemed to be the only one who could interpret the pictures taken with it. They could not begin to compare with the ones taken by George De la Warr which I later saw in England. They weren’t clear cut whereas De la Warr’s were very clear. A bone was clearly recognizable as a bone, a stomach, a stomach or a gall bladder, a gall bladder. Dr. Drown also could not duplicate her pictures but De la Warr could. Drown maintained that duplication was impossible because of the different amount of energy flowing through a particular organ each moment. But from my observations of both techniques. I don’t think that was the case.

    CBird: What were your conclusions about these various devices?

    FARRELLY: It was when I was working with Dr. Drown that I first began to feel that the instruments themselves were not doing the work. Occasionally we’d get a blood sample and believe we were testing it in the instrument only to find that, when we went to remove it, we’d forgotten to put it there. So I began to wonder exactly who or what was being tested.

    CBird: Your results were just as effective as if you had put the blood sample into the device?

    FARRELLY: Precisely, as long as we knew the patient. Then, too, the Drown instrument operated with no electricity. Other devices used electricity. It was her theory that the sample of blood or hair, or whatever it was, was a part of the patient and therefore in constant rapport with him or her and that one was just tuning in on that frequency, for that patient. There were many other theories developed, here and abroad. I don’t think any of them were even close to correct.

    CBird: Did you develop your own theory or reconcile the various theories, which were around?

    FARRELLY: Both. And I got the chance when I was introduced to Arthur Middleton Young, inventor of the Bell helicopter, who was running his Foundation for the Study of Consciousness in New York City. I went to work for him for what I thought would be one summer and stayed over five years. Arthur was interested in radionics but felt strongly that the results obtained with this art were a function of consciousness, that they came not from the machines themselves but from the operators.

    I had to admit that I had been successful in diagnosis even when blood samples of patients had been inadvertently left out of the instruments. Also, I had noted that, when certain devices which usually operated on AC current were surreptitiously unplugged, the operator could still go on making successful diagnoses, even though the radio tubes and other components were not electrically activated.

    CBird: What kind of research was conducted at the foundation?

    FARRELLY: We began with experiments on plants and animals, especially with the effects of insecticides. We sprayed fruits and vegetables with DDT and then treated them radionically to try to remove the effects of the poison. Analytic tests run at the Laboratory of Industrial Hygiene in New York City indicated that the treated samples showed less insecticide than those untreated.

    We also wanted to see if we could counteract the effects of arsenic poisoning in mice. We fed them nothing but a standard commercial mouse poison but none of them showed any effects from it. Young talked to a professional vermin exterminator who maintained that the poison should have been lethal. He gave us another poison “strong enough to kill a horse.” We gave the mice this stronger dose but, again, none of them would die.

    CBird: How did you explain this?

    FARRELLY: Arthur Young’s deduction was that since I had not intended to kill the animals in the first place, the strength of my intent overrode the strength of the position.

    We did many other interesting experiments with plants and small animals. One of them was to see if some ancient Mexican figurines would have any effect on mice.

    One of these figures was eighteen or so inches tall with a fluted neck. I connected it by copper wire to a mouse cage, the statue being three feet from the cage. The mice in the cage immediately got agitated. They would crawl under the paper in the cage as if trying to hide. After about two days, half of the tail of one mouse fell off and even more strangely, its ears developed fluting on their edges. While keeping two more mice under constant observation, we were able to flute the ears on them as well. (See pictures of mouse and figurine.) I took these mice to a nationally known laboratory at Bar Harbor, Maine, where they raise mice and asked if the ear fluting could somehow have been caused by the mice scratching or biting. The laboratory experts said they’d never seen anything even closely resembling the fluting. They had no explanation for it.

    We took other figurines and tried out their effects on mice. One of them caused pregnant mice to abort. I later found out that the psychic Fredrick Marion, author of In My Mind’s Eye had psychometrized some of our figurines and had ‘seen’ a group of people potentizing them for various uses.

    CBird: What other radionics research did you do?

    FARRELLY: Mr. Young sent me to England to make a study of radionics there. I met people in various medical radiesthesia groups: one composed exclusively of doctors, one made up of people Dr. Drown had trained while in England and, the third, people trained by the De la Warrs.

    It was then that I had a good look at the De la Warr camera. It wasn’t really a camera. It had no light source. It could be operated only by the physicist Leonard Corte. Other people could use it successfully only if Corte loaded the films put in it.

    I decided that there was something which tied the camera specifically to Corte. He suggested we take it apart and that I handle all the various separate mechanical components in order to impress my own energy upon them. After I ran my fingers over all the internal components of the camera, I was able to get pictures, albeit somewhat less clearly than Corte.

    CBird: What else did you do in England?

    FARRELLY: While there, I also spoke to a group of prominent physicians at the office of Michael Ash, an orthodox doctor who was experimenting with healing by the laying-on-of-hands. I did some healing with him. Ash had a theory about the radionics devices which corresponded with that of Arthur Young. To test it, he brought a deaf-dumb-and-blind patient to this office and introduced me by writing my name with his foreigner in her hand. He told me to step up to her and lay my hands on her and tell him what was ailing here. When I stepped towards her, I got a sudden severe pain across my middle and a searing flash of heat on the right side of my head affecting an area about the size of a quarter dollar. I immediately stepped back and both pains disappeared. When I approached her again, they returned. I looked at Dr. Ash and, knowing the patient couldn’t hear me, I asked what was wrong with her across her middle. He chided me to be more anatomically specific.

    I began surveying various organs of the body in my head. Diaphragm. Stomach. Liver. I got no reaction to any of these and others until I thought “pancreas.” Then the pain in my middle instantly returned. I asked myself if it was the head of the pancreas. The pain disappeared again. Same for the tail of the pancreas. I thought: “the Isles of Langerhann, which make insulin.” I immediately got a sharp pain back again in what was obviously my own pancreas.

    I told Dr. Ash it was the Isles of Langerhann. He nodded affirmatively and asked if I felt anything else. I decided to plunge ahead and felt a hot spot on my head. I ran a few possibilities through my head: “tumor?” “growth?” Finally “blood clot” occurred to me and when it did, I felt the hot pain in my head.

    When I gave this diagnosis to Dr. Ash, he beamed. “See, you are the instrument, not those devices you’ve been working with. This woman got this way from a diabetic coma and indeed has a blood clot in the very area you’ve pinpointed.”

     

    CBird: Did you make other diagnoses for Dr. Ash?

    FARRELLY: I spent two more weeks with him and sat next to him at his desk writing down my impressions about all his patients. That gave me much more confidence to go ahead and work without the instrument. I would just hold a blood sample in my hand and either directly feel what the patient was afflicted with or determine it by rubbing, not on the plate of a radionics device, but right on the top of the desk or table in front of me.

    CBird: Today you just do the rubbing when necessary don’t you?

    FARRELLY: Yes. It was when I was about to leave the Young’s in 1960 that I began working with the California psychiatrist Shafica Karagulla, M.D. I gave up tuning into people directly and getting a pain because my senses were becoming so acute that if I were, say, just sitting in a train, I would begin unconsciously to pick up pains from the people in the same car I was in. My back, my shoulders, my stomach would ache. My bunions would hurt. And the emotions of various people would assail me to the point that I hardly knew how I was feeling myself. I’d feel sad and mad and glad, all at the same time. I could pick out the person associated with each pain or emotion but I had to learn how to shut this out because it was becoming overpowering.

    CBird: What use is a radionics device, do you think, if people like yourself can diagnose without it?

    FARRELLY: I believe it acts something like a dowsing device. A dowser uses a divining rod or a pendulum to get answers. The rod or pendulum acts to signal a yes or no answer to the questions. In my case, the rubbing provided the answer. The technique I employ may be ages old. There is a passage in a book, Witchcraft, Oracles and Magic Among the Azande by the celebrated English anthropologist, Edward Evans-Prichard relating how a witchdoctor made a little round disk with a tail on it and another disk with a handle on it. He’d sit down and put his foot on the tail to hold it steady and then he’d rub the other disk over it and then ask, for example, if his neighbor’s pigs had cholera. If it stuck, they had the disease. If it slid smoothly, they did not. The technique hardly differs from my own.

    CBird: Have your talents been formally tested by doctors?

    FARRELLY: I have been repeatedly asked by doctors to take some hundred samples and analyze them under test conditions, being promised that the data I supplied would be written up formally by them in medical or other specialized journals to put the radionics technique on the map, so to speak.

    Well, “I’ve spent hundreds of hours fulfilling these requests. Perhaps some of these doctors even did go ahead and write up the data, but I’ve never seen any of their accounts in print.

    CBird: Why, do you think?

    FARRELLY: It’s hard to say. I believe that either the editors of journals would not accept such an article or that the authors are warned by friendly colleagues not to stick their heads out by associating themselves with what must appear to be pure mumbo-jumbo to the medical profession as presently constituted.

    Radionics, as you know, principally refers to a device or instrument and its use, at least in the United States. I believe the term “radiesthesia” which on the continent means “medical dowsing” is better, because it does not imply that an instrument is the key to the diagnostic art.

    There has been half a century of controversy about Abrams-type “magic boxes” or radionics devices. At issue today in the United States is whether the science of radionics is against the law. To his letter to the United States Food and Drug Administration asking this question, Mr. Edward W. Russell received the following reply: “In answer to your specific question, the ‘practice of Radionic Medicine’ is not forbidden by the FDA, however, devices intended for such use may be ‘misbranded’ within the meaning of that term under the Federal Food, Drug Cosmetic Act.” The FDA further stated to Mr. Russell: “In order to comply with the statute, a device used in ‘Radionic Medicine’ must be safe, effective and properly labeled. Frankly, we know of no way of labeling a device so that it would bear adequate directions for use for Radionic Medicine.

    I agree 100% with the FDA. From what is scientifically known today, or from what radionic operators have said about their instruments in the past, there’s no way a device could be labeled correctly for use.

    From the historical point of view, I feel that it is important to remember that Dr. Abrams, who founded the art of radionics, referred to “electronic reactions.” In 1898, electronics was coming into vogue. So Abrams used ohms of resistance to measure the so-called “rates” from various bodily organs. When Drown came along in the 1920s, radio was becoming the new rage. She called her method “radiotherapy.” Now we’re in the computer age and I hear that some radionics practitioners are labeling the technique “computerized analysis.”

    CBird: But what about the radionics instruments as devices for, not diagnosis, but treatment? How is the treatment effected, if it is?

    FARRELLY: I wish I knew. I know that it works but don’t know why or how. There are several different methods for treatment. Drown would use a diagnostic rate to determine an affliction and then select a remedy, put it in the circuitry of the machine, and claim that the treatment was affected by the vibrations from the remedy.

    The De la Warrs used what they called a “complementary rate.” They subtracted a diagnostic rate, say, for flu which is 38 and subtract each of the digits from 10 to get 72, which was the treating rate. This also seemed to work.

    Dr. Love had a third method. He’d use another number to annul the first one. If he had a rate for flu, he’d work the dials on the device until he found another number which would completely wipe out his reaction to it.

    Even after thirty years in the field, I don’t know how the treatment instruments work, whether for humans or animals.

    CBird: What has been the track record?

    FARRELLY: Whether it was Dr. Love, Dr. Drown, De la Warr or others, they all have claimed a very high percentage of success with all kinds of illnesses. But it also depended to what stage the disease had advanced. This applies to any disease. It is my impression that with treatment devices using electricity, such as the one developed by T. Galen Hieronymous, the treatment seemed to proceed faster than those which used no electrical current such as the Drown and De la Warr instruments. I know that Dr. Love’s treating machines which used electricity, accomplish in three minutes what it took Dr. Drown’s an hour to accomplish. But I don’t know how to account for this.

    CBird: Do most doctors today send you cases they simply cannot diagnose or do they use you as a sort of diagnostic machine for everything?

    FARRELLY: Both, some for tough cases, others routinely. I am much more challenged by the tough cases. For example, I had to analyze a sample from a sixteen-year-old who’d had a history of chronic ear trouble. In checking it, I first found it was bacterial so I began checking through the bacteria. And I found tuberculosis. This seems impossible since I’d never heard of tuberculosis in the ear. But I relied on my analysis and sent it to the doctor. He called me long distance to ask: “Have you lost your cotton-picking mind? Whoever heard of TB in the ear?” I told him I didn’t know, but would stick with that diagnosis, no matter how far-fetched it might seem.

    The next day he called me back to say that he’d spoken to the patient’s mother, a registered nurse, and told her that she should have a bacterial exam made but using, as I’d suggested in my report, an acid-fast stain to reveal TB. The doctor was surprised that, instead of getting angry, the mother told him that her child had a swollen gland on the side of the neck at age six months. The gland had been found to be tubercular. But they never made a connection with TB and the running ear.

    Christopher Bird: How do you work with doctors?

    FARRELLY: I am sent a sample of the patient’s blood. I no longer sit with the patient; all of my work now is done in absentia.

    I also have a form which they fill out about their patients, which contains standard statistical information requests, as well as any history that may be important to the current complaint. The reason I ask for a current history is because there might be something I need to check which would fall outside the routine diagnosis I ordinarily do. For example, ordinarily I don’t check the eyes or ears or parts of the brain. But if the history warrants or a special request is made, I can go into the specific areas in detail.

    CBird: What’s your procedure in diagnosing, your methodology?

    FARRELLY: I do a physical report on the various organs and glands of the body, as well as a vitamin assay. In addition, I check the remedies of Edward Bach, M.D., M.B., D.P.H., who was a homeopathic physician. These are homeopathic remedies made in England for treatment of what Dr. Bach calls “the problems of the spirit of man, such as anger, concern, conflict, jealousy, and so on.”

    Also, if the doctor asks for it, I run allergy tests on about 700 allergens and am further able to select and suggest suitable dietary supplements for the patient.

    I work for about as many MDs and osteopaths, as I do chiropractors. Of course it depends on each doctor’s professional limitations in what I would suggest for his patient. This also applies to the selection or suggestion of medications, or if I feel that surgery is indicated. I have to keep within the realms of what each person’s license permits him to do.

    CBird: Do you only diagnose for doctors?

    FARRELLY: Yes. I don’t do it for individuals because I would then be both diagnosing and prescribing, which would be outside the law.

    PSYCHIC: Then the only way for someone personally to use your services is to find a doctor who is sympathetic and understanding to your methods of diagnosis.

    FARRELLY: That’s right. But there are more and more doctors willing to work with patients in this manner, although when I began doing this back in the 1940s, there were hardly any physicians willing to work with me or their patients on this basis. Yet most of the ones I work with still wish to remain anonymous. So I leave it up to each particular doctor if they wish to disclose our association.

    CBird: Do all of them know that you use a psychic method and not an orthodox one in diagnosing the blood samples and data they send you?

    FARRELLY: Yes. They all know that I’m using psychic means to diagnose their samples. Mostly all have been referred to me by other doctors; I make no effort to go out and get them. In the beginning, they’re quite curious but then become accustomed to my procedure. Currently I work with about 70 doctors across the country, many of whom have been using my services for over ten years now.

    CBird: How do you get yourself in a state to do a diagnosis?

    FARRELLY: I just focus my attention on the blood sample and data starts coming about the person. Also, it helps immensely to focus my attention when the diagnosis is a challenge to me. But if I received a report that indicated that someone was getting gas from eating onions, that’s no challenge. I would just naturally, without psychically looking into it, think, “Well, why the devil are they eating onions!”

    CBird: Are you able to turn on and off at will?

    FARRELLY: Yes, over the years it’s become an automatic thing. I just go into a state — probably an altered state of consciousness — by merely focusing my attention on the case at hand. And I know I’m not in a trance, because I am still aware of what’s going on around me, yet I’m not disturbed by it. I was once tested on a bio-feedback machine which showed that I apparently slip very easily in and out of alpha (alpha brainwave state) which is necessary since I have to come back up again to write my report as I go along.

    CBird: How do you distinguish between the patient’s ailment and your own?

    FARRELLY: Sometimes when I’m looking at the patient and I’m not sure whether it’s his pain or mine, then I will ask myself, “What’s the matter with me?” If the pain goes away, then I know it’s the patient’s and not mine.

    CBird: Since you feel and sense things, do you ever see anything visually?

    FARRELLY: I’m a very poor clairvoyant. I do see psychically, but it’s not normal for me. And it has to be rather dark, not full light. During such times I have seen colors about the person — like the aura other people describe — and then I see a dark spot in the area of the person where there’s a problem. But I don’t have full control over this at all, because sometimes I see and sometimes I don’t. The feeling part is the one I can rely on much more steadily. And when I’m testing from a blood sample, I do not feel the pain or the emotional factors of the person.

    CBird: What about pictures or scenes?

    FARRELLY: Yes. Sometimes they occur in a flash. For example, once while driving a car I actually saw the front tire with a bulge on it ready to blow out. I was able to stop in time to avoid the blowout.

    CBird: Have you ever used your technique outside the medical field?

    FARRELLY: I’ve located lost objects and missing persons. I should say that, to me, a very important fact in this work is the purpose or intent of the client. In my opinion, this has a great deal to do with success. For example, when someone hides something and asks that I locate it, I’m not really turned on to the task because I know they already know where it is. But if it is a real challenge — being truly helpful instead of just demonstrating — I get turned on.

     

     

    CBird: What have been some of your useful cases in searching for missing people?

    FARRELLY: Just recently, a woman called me to say that her son had gone out in a boat and not returned by nightfall. The weather being bad, she was worried and asked me if I could say where he was. I got a map of the Tampa Bay area and taking a photo of the boy, I ran through a number of questions and put an “X” mark on a sand bar off a small island. That’s where the Coast Guard found his boat stuck with the boy still in it.

    Then at the First International Meeting for Psychotronic Research, held in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1973, some of the Czech scientists who had heard me lecture asked me to tell them the age and origin of a small mineralized sample they’d brought with them. I sat down at a wooden table and within about three minutes I told them it was three million, two hundred thousand years old and came from a meteorite. They confirmed that, according to the best judgment of their experts, both my answers were correct.

    CBird: Has this changed your philosophy of life or view of the cosmos?

    FARRELLY: In the beginning it shook me up considerably, since my background had been quite orthodox — I’m a Christian. But I learned to accept it as a normal part of my life.

    As for my view on the cosmos, I have a very definite feeling that there’s a creator — an organized force and energy. And I have no difficulty in accepting a great many of the philosophies and religions. For example, I don’t have any difficulty in accepting beliefs in reincarnation, and I certainly believe in a continuity of life. As I see it, there is this organization force in the universe and we as a part of it have our roles to play.

    CBird: Do you think you have guides or entities helping you as some sensitives seem to?

    FARRELLY: I don’t deny such presences but I don’t call upon them for help. I feel my approach — the one that works for me — is a little more direct in that I spend a certain amount of time in prayer and mediation each day — without entities interceding. To me it’s the God energy, the Great Spirit, or whatever you want to call it.

    CBird: Do you think your technique can be taught?

    FARRELLY: I think so. People have varying grades of psychic ability which they can be taught to use effectively. A lot depends on their interest and devotion. I’d like to see many people trained. Children are especially gifted but need training to develop their gifts. Unfortunately, the gift is usually trained out of them just as it was with me when I was a child.

    CBird: What else do you think is important to the technique besides personal motivation?

    FARRELLY: Several things. First, the truth. Any doctor working with me must know how I work, I say “psychically” for short though I often go into a long description of the process for them. Second, and most important, is evaluation of accuracy. If, for example, I find gallstones, or a brain tumor, the doctors I work for will follow through with so-called orthodox methods to prove or disprove my work. In turn, they will advise me of their findings. Lastly, and no less important is to continually share what knowledge I have about the subject with others.

    I find many young people, engineers, doctors, and physicists who have heard either of the Hieronymous or De la Warr “boxes,” eager to rush out and build replicas of them or at least something similar. I always ask them “Why?” I then go on to tell them that they are the operators and that it is the operators who are the equipment.

    So I would say to anyone: You don’t need a device. Train yourself to use your psychic ability.

    I am encouraged, after some thirty years in the field, that psychic ability and ESP are more widely and openly accepted because somewhere in the field of radiesthesia, or dowsing, lies the basis of so-called radionics, not in the instrumentation. Everyone longs to make an instrument that will read out answers on a graph or flashlights. To date no one has accomplished this. But if any knowledge I have about the various instruments would help some bright young person to come up with such a device, I will feel I have contributed to the accomplishment in some small way.

     


    Biography

     

    Born in Vermont, Frances Farrelly was raised in Norwood, Massachusetts, south of Boston. Her childhood was replete with psychic experiences, including healing and being able to see “the little people.”

    Of a religious bent from early life, she entered Saint Lawrence University at Canton, New York, an Universalist Church theological school, to study for the ministry. At the outset, she began to doubt the theology taught, which the dean told her was merely a case of “freshman measles.” Yet the doubt persisted, and in her junior year she “dropped out.”

    Opting for a more practical profession, Ms. Farrelly enrolled in the Northwest Institute of Medical Technology in Minneapolis, and after graduation, with three of her classmates, opened her own school for medical technicians in Utica, New York. She later moved to Florida’s west coast and started another school in Sarasota. Unmarried, she also adopted two infant boys, Stephen and Peter.

    The year 1944 was a traumatic one in her life. Hardly had she learned that her father, to whom she was deeply devoted, was killed in an automobile accident than her son Peter, age 4, fell out of the car she was driving and died within hours, despite her best efforts to save him. Two days later, her business went bankrupt.

    With only seven dollars in the bank, Ms. Farrelly took a job as a teacher in a small private school. But she soon found that work insufficiently demanding, so took up laboratory work again, this time in a new hospital, where she demonstrated such skill that she was appointed inspector of Milk and Water by the city of Sarasota, as well as the county, and later appointed State Examiner.

    While her laboratory work was expanding, she was invited by a young woman physician who admired her work to lecture to a local medical society on clinical interpretations of hematology reports. After the meeting, the two had coffee together and became friends. A general practitioner, the physician informed Ms. Farrelly that she was interested in “electronic medicine,” a peculiar art of diagnosis which had first been developed at the turn of the century by the San Francisco genius and Director of Medical Studies at Stanford University, Albert Abrams, M.D.

    Abrams’s method of diagnosis by picking up “vibrations” from healthy or diseased tissue with the help of a strange “black box” of his own design was ridiculed by scientific and medical establishments in the United States, though not before he had trained over 3,000 doctors in its use. In England the “box” was officially tested by a committee chaired by Sir Thomas Horder, M.D. who later became physician to the royal family. Its main conclusion was that Abrams’s “electronic reactions” were valid in diagnosis and should be investigated in depth. This recommendation and challenge was never taken up by the British Medical Association.

    It was when Ms. Farrelly met one of Abrams’s students who introduced her to the use of the “box” that she became convinced that a new method of diagnosis, astounding in its accuracy and rapidity, had been invented. Through her physician friend, she was introduced to Dr. Ruth Drown of Pasadena, California, one of Dr. Abrams’s most brilliant followers. Dr. Drown asked Ms. Farrelly to come and work with her.

    When, after a short-lived period of service in an Anglican sisterhood, Frances Farrelly found herself once again penniless, she remembered Dr. Drown’s offer. A phone call to California landed her the job. After several months’ work with Dr. Drown, whose innovative work was later attacked as fraudulent by the medical establishment and the FDA, she met Arthur Young, the inventor of the Bell Helicopter, who had formed the Foundation for the Study of Consciousness in New York City. She was employed by Young in investigating the diagnostic techniques of Dr. Abrams, which were flowering in England under the name of “radionics.”

    While investigating radionics in the U.S. and England, Ms. Farrelly became increasingly skeptical about the radionic “box” device used in the diagnostic technique. She came to the conclusion that the operators were themselves the devices.

    Returning to Florida in 1960, she found the demand for her psychicdiagnostic work becoming so large that she eventually had to devote full time to it. Today she provides her unique service to professionals only — physicians, osteopaths, chiropractors throughout the country. “I can no longer diagnose on a personal basis,” she says, “because there is not enough time and because there is always the possibility that it might be construed as being illegal.”

    Three years ago, after working out of the Bahamas for several years, she founded her own company, Update Consultants, in St. Petersburg, Florida, where she now makes her home.

    #3201
    EKEK
    Keymaster

    In 1987 my late husband, Christopher Bird, whose passion was bringing frontier science to the fore, travelled for months in Australia researching for his book “Secrets of the Soil” which he co-authored with Peter Tomkins. This led him to a deeper understanding of Biodynamic Agriculture. Also in 1969 and again in 1987 Chris interviewed scientist/inventor T. Galin Hieronymus for his chapter entitled “Cosmiculture”.

    I’m personally dedicated to the entire planet being covered with living soils in the next 200 years, which will require passionately inspired young blood. Since arriving in Melbourne on September third 2009 to partner with my former neighbour, Hugh Lovel,

    I have been blessed to visit with Hugh’s clients on farms, livestock stations, biodynamic dairies, vineyards, orchards and vegetable operations, all of which have opted for a new approach to agriculture that we call Quantum Agriculture. It is exciting seeing these ideas, based on biodynamics and the quantum nature of reality, put to use, and Australian farmers seem to be leading the way. –Shabari Bird, 22-11-2009

     

    When interviewing farmers and station owners I ask who is going take over your operation when you retire? Ninety percent have no answer. I see the dearth of passionate and dedicated new farmers as a greater issue for the planet than the short-sighted exploitations of corporate chemical agriculture.

     

    A Case In Point

     

    When Hugh and I first drove into Kyabra Station near Kentucky, NSW on an early spring day, I was intrigued to see a cheerfully painted building with an amusing illustration of a ram lying in a lounge chair, wearing sunglasses and reading Playboy magazine. Above were the words, Ram Resort. Surely something different was occurring here.

    We were warmly greeted and served a delicious lunch by Susan Lytton-Hitchins and her husband Michael; and within minutes in walked their son, Peter, manager of Kyabra and developer of the distinctive breed of sheep branded Coolmeina. A dynamic thirty year old who has passionately embraced cutting edge eco-agriculture, Peter grew up on his parent’s 1000 acre sheep station south of Sydney where, amongst other things, the family spent a decade stirring and spraying the Biodynamic Preparations.

    At sixteen Peter met Dr. Jim Watts, whose unique breeding system kindled Peter’s personal ‘sheep quest’ and changed the course of his family’s enterprise. Peter wondered if they had a larger acreage and more sheep what could they genetically develop; and he spent several years researching and consulting with experts to create his future plan for a new breed of sheep.

    Every animal has dominant and recessive genes, but for 200 years Australian sheep breeders have paid little attention. Dr. Watts’ approach takes time and a genetic pool of thousands of sheep. Peter’s family vigorously embraced Dr. Watt’s SRS (Soft Rolling Skin) method by purchasing a much larger station. This nature based approach requires understanding how Nature produces the animal and how the skin of the animal grows the fibre structure. Then it is possible to carefully select how fine your fibre will be.

    To create the Coolmeina breed Peter included such natural factors as year round cover and rotational grazing, and the development of more than 250 carefully tended, ecologically sustainable paddocks for nutritional support. Peter spent a mere 12 years using a breeding pool of 85,000 sheep to create the Coolmeina breed. While wool is the oldest natural and sustainable fibre, working with nature at Kyabra Station they generated a new natural fibre that is so fine it is no longer called wool but is globally branded as Coolmeina. This breed is raised on open pastures, tenderly cared for and carefully rotated to provide an even plane of nutrition. Coolmeina fibre is so sensual against the skin that you think it is silk, while at the same time it has such stretchiness that it is in a class by itself, and the price received reflects the fact that this fibre is the finest (13.6 micron) in the world.

    As Peter notes, the secret to success in agriculture is understanding nature instead of over-riding nature. Kyabra Station’s Coolmeina breed is extremely fertile and fast growing with particularly loose and non wrinkling skin structure, suited to low intensive farming. They eat less, produce less methane, eat a greater variety of forages and are easier on pasture. An added benefit of breeding an animal whose skin and fibre is very fast growing is the animal not only does not need mulesing—a barbaric mutilation that is being phased out all over Australia—it also does not need jetting, which is the external application of a liquid substance to kill parasites and deter infection by blow flies. This is important since fly strike is the main cause of death in sheep.

     

    The Ram Resort

     

    One of the challenges in breeding a new animal is how to speed up the process. Peter did this through embryo transplant and artificial insemination, but he points out that you must work with nature and understands the animal’s natural cycles when approaching such a new method or technology. You can abuse technologies without understanding the power of nature and actually create huge negatives in your system. In this case working with nature involved observation of the merino breed. Although female sheep can be bred at any time, rams have several breeding cycles annually where the semen quality varies with the season. Some of the rams will have inferior semen during some of these cycles, and Peter and his team learned to collect the semen when a ram’s testosterone is at its highest and when the semen’s possibility of defective and inferior genes are lowest. A lot of this has to do with the quality of the environment, which should be as optimal as possible. To soak up the summer rain and yet thrive during drought and the extreme temperatures of the area at Kyabra Station they implemented a planned paddock and lane system where even a child could move the sheep with ease, and this gave rise to a deep rooted native pasture. In designing and achieving this high quality grazing system Peter was especially inspired by Allan Savory and Holistic Management International.

    Peter pointed out that they keep everything as simple as they can to stimulate as much biological activity as possible. In their planned grazing system they prefer using animals instead of tractors. Instead of ploughing, their animals become the helpers that loosen and build the soil. Animals create the manure which supports both the flora and fauna of biologically active soils while sequestering carbon. Leaving the soil mostly undisturbed, with plant roots in place and stubble and crop litter on the surface allows soil micro-organisms to flourish. Then when these micro-organisms die, their decay creates carbon-rich humus that improves soil structure and water retention. This overthrows the assumption that animals degrade the soil. The rule is everything in balance. Obviously overgrazing can harm the soil, but plant growth must be digested to build soil.

    People should give more consideration to what animals really add to the environment. If organic soil carbon were increased at the rate of one tonne per hectare per year over 30 million hectares, this would greatly contribute to carbon sequestration. Grazing animals can be a key part of the solution to global warming. One aspect of this is selective breeding, because individual animals vary significantly in their methane and fibre outputs. Another aspect is careful management of nutrition, since sheep and cattle produce less methane when grazing on good quality bio-diverse pastures. Over a period of a few decades, environmentally aware paddock management can probably restore or improve on the original soil carbon of most farm soils.

     

    Energy in Agriculture

     

    Peter calls his system natural biological farming. He recognizes the connection of all the creatures and their life force, the free nitrogen above and animal and microbial life in the soils and on the land—a concept compatible with their years of experience with biodynamic agriculture, which conceives of a farm as a living, self-contained entity with its own individual characteristics. In Peter’s system emphasis is placed on the integration of crops and livestock, recycling of nutrients, maintenance of soil, and the health and well being of crops and animals. The farmer too, along with his family life, is part of this whole.

    In Peter’s opinion the success of every business depends on how well it uses its energy. Energy creates life and is in all things. On the one hand he feels the BD patterns give an energy boost to the soil, and on the other he is a fan of low cost and low input methods that give a significant kick to the system. Peter knew that they could not continue the practice of stirring and spraying the biodynamic preparations at Kyabra Station with its sixteen thousand acres. Moreover, Peter and his family found that stirring and spraying biodynamic preparations worked well where soils had moisture but not so well where rain fall is challenged. After considerable investigation he believed that using Field Broadcasters could best fill this need. Thus to establish the homeopathic biodynamic energy patterns he installed three field broadcasters as a way to save money while more rapidly stimulating the energy of Kyabra Station’s paddocks.

     

    Earth and Sky

     

    Surely earthworms are the gate keepers of the soil. In addition, Peter has come to appreciate that there is a balance between the atmosphere and the soil. By stimulating the organizational patterns of the atmosphere with an Atmospheric Reorganizer, another of Hugh Lovel’s devices that utilize biodynamic preparations, he hopes to establish a better relationship between the soil and the atmosphere. Peter believes that a good farmer must work with the energies of the earth environment, both seen and unseen, and he finds the synergy of these Quantum Agriculture implements are compatible with all his other management tools. Peter noted that Nature has loads of invisible presences and processes.

    Because he increased his knowledge and wisdom through consultants like Allan Savory, Jim Watts, Graeme Sait and Hugh Lovel, he recommends that all young farmers bring in consultants in those areas where they need support. He also feels farmers should keep benchmarks so that each year they are able to refer to the data for that year. Thus he tasks helpers to record data, and he feels gratified that his ‘sheep quest’ has led him to using his management skills along with his inquiring mind to build a new approach to sheep grazing which includes teaching of the method.

     

    In Summary

     

    Peter’s passion for agriculture is the driving force behind Kyabra Station. He states “Tomorrow is about producing food, fibre and fuel for the future and simultaneously restoring the balance of nature and sustainable fertility of the soil. Young farmers have the possibility of great financial success in the future because of the mass desire for highly nutritious and densely organized plants which are sustainable.” Peter encourages other young farmers to create their plan now. “Agriculture is where we can improve the environment; agriculture will create the products that will fuel the world, build our homes, and anyone entering agriculture is in the most exciting industry for the future. Without agriculture life will not exist on our planet.”

    #3202
    EKEK
    Keymaster

    Radionics as defined by The Oxford Dictionary is “the study and interpretation of radiation believed to be emitted from substances.” Initially it was developed by Dr. Albert Abrams at the turn of the twentieth century and later in England by George and Marjorie De La Warr. Since then much research has been conducted into the working of these “unexplained” infinitesimal moving particles of radiation emanating from all things.

    Radionic treatments were tested in several cornfields in the U.S. in 1952 and produced a 92% success rate in controlling the Japanese beetle and 58% success with corn borers. So much attention was drawn to these results that insecticide representatives along with the U.S. Department of Agriculture discredited this early research as fraudulent. Nevertheless, T. Galen Hieronymus, Dr. Ruth Drown, Frances Farrelly, William Tiller, and many others have continued to work with energy patterns which produce consistently successful results only with an essential added human element—thoughtful love. While much is left to explain working with energy radiations, the answers most assuredly lie within the realm of the Divine Mind.

    I met Fran Farrelly in 1989 in Atlanta. She was a dear friend of late husband Christopher Bird and our friend and mentor, Arthur Middleton Young.

    #3203
    EKEK
    Keymaster

    In 1973, I was diagnosed with stage 4 non-Hodgkin’s

    Lymphoma. I left Sloan-Kettering Hospital in shock. I was

    twenty-four years old and an up and rising woman

    stock broker.

     

    My heart longed for nature and I decided to

    move to my parent’s summer cabin in the Blueridge Mountains

    of North Georgia. I had wisely decided to fight back this death sentence.

    I chose the Gerson regime and fasted on carrot and

    other vegetable juices for nearly a year.

     

    During this time I started my first ever garden. As I planted

    the veggies and flowers I dug up huge, sometimes four feet
    Poke_root_0

    long, roots.

    I had been befriended by some local elders

    who were teaching me about plants and herbs.

    Unwisely I decided to put this mystery root in my juicer with carrots.

    Within thirty minutes I was hallucinating and then

    came vomiting and frothy diarrhea. This went on for almost

    eight hours. My neighbors came and sat on the bed and

    helped the best they could. Since they knew I had cancer, they

    had assumed I was dying. During that time, I assumed I was

    dying, in fact I felt so badly, I would have preferred death.

    Well, death did not come. In fact two weeks later, I was

    in better health than for the previous two years and all

    my lymphatic swellings and tenderness in my spleen had

    completely disappeared. My neighbors commented that

    I looked and acted like a new and different person.

     

    What was this powerful and magic root? Poke (Ink Plant) root with

    the genus name of Phytolacca. This plant has become my

    ally for the forty years since then. I have spent time

    every year since then studying it, how to use it, how to

    heal with it, how to harvest it and how to grow it.

     

    My old time Cherokee Medicine teacher

    had told me about using Poke for Bone Spurs.

    In the past five years over thirty people I know have

    successfully dissolved Bone Spurs in the neck, spine and

    feet using three dried Pokeberries a day for one month.

    Twenty people I know are currently using one dried Pokeberry

    a day effectively controlling pain of arthritis and

    Rheumatism. Two women I know have dissolved breast

    tumors with three Pokeberries and Poke Root Poultices

    daily for three months.

     

    Poke Root is also known by the names Pigeon Berry,

    Cancer Root, Red Ink Plant, Shang-lu, Congora,

    Coakum, Inkberry, Scoke, and Red Weed. Poke Root

    is an American perennial shrub which grows in damp

    woodlands, hedges, and waste places, especially in the

    South. The parts of this plant used medicinally are the

    roots and the berries. The genus name Phytolacca is

    from the Greek “phyton”, meaning “plant”, and the

    French word “lac” in reference to the plant’s ability to

    yield a “reddish dye”. The name Poke is derived from an

    Indian word “pocan”, a name for any plant that yields

    a red dye, and from “pak”, meaning “blood”. A dye

    from the fermented berries has been used as ink and paint, and for

    basket coloring. In fact, the United States Constitution

    was written in Pokeberry ink.

    Pokeberry_1

    Early Tribal healers and the 19th-century American

    Eclectic Physicians who popularized Native botanicals

    knew Poke as a powerful lymphatic system stimulant

    and medicine for arthritis and various skin diseases.

    Today, herbalists use Poke cautiously for similar conditions

    and scientific researchers are investigating its

    antiviral, anticancer, antifungal, anti-rheumatic, and

    immune stimulant properties.

    The Eclectic Physicians, a group of botanically inclined

    practitioners working in the 19th and early

    20th centuries, left an extensive literature on the

    clinical use of Native American plants including

    Phytolacca.

     

    Phytolacca was known to the Eclectics as a powerful

    remedy in cases of mastitis, breast cysts, testicular and

    breast cancers as well as other types of cancers. It was

    rightfully considered to be a potent medicine that was

    cautiously used to help correct serious health problems.

    Today, practitioners use homeopathic preparations of

    Phytolacca, or small doses of the tincture, dried Pokeberries

    or extract made from the root or berries.

    Modern practitioners use Poke in cases of acute or

    chronic infection as an immune stimulant and lymphatic

    system alterative, as an effective anti-inflammatory in

    rheumatoid arthritis and similar conditions, and as part

    of a treatment for breast conditions including mastitis,

    cysts, and cancers. It is also employed for “ringworm”

    and other fungal conditions of the skin.

    The berries of Poke are very interesting in that they

    contain good medicine and fewer toxins than other parts

    of the plant – with the exception of their seeds. Some

    Appalachian old-timers will swallow one to three dried

    berries whole, not crunching up the seeds, as a tonic for

    “rheumatism.” They say that the seeds won’t hurt you if

    you don’t break them open. Research in Italy has shown

    that the enzymes in the berries effectively neutralize the

    toxins in the seeds. I always recommend that the dried

    berries be swallowed whole and never chewed.

    The only well-documented report of a fatality from

    Poke that I have yet found – after my 35 years of research – is

    a case of a child dying after the ingestion of “grape juice”

    made from large amounts of crushed berries – ones with

    the seeds broken open.

     

    The truth is that Poke, when properly

    used, is both safe and effective. It can also be a serious

    poison when ingested improperly, but is far less poisonous

    than some other plants and many pharmaceutical drugs.

    A study published in 1995 by Krenzelok and Provost in

    the Journal of Natural Toxins analyzed information from

    American Poison Information Centers over a recent tenyear

    period. They found that Poke was the seventh most

    frequently ingested poisonous plant, but that 65.3 % of

    these exposures resulted in “no effect,” 5.8 % in a “minor

    effect,” and 0.4 % in a “moderate effect”; there were no

    fatalities reported.

     

    Scientists continue to search for new uses for this

    potent herb. In Africa, the plant is being investigated for its ability

    to control Bilharzia, a parasitic disease contracted by bathing

    in water containing certain snails. In Argentina, the

    methanolic extract of the berries of Phytolacca tetramera,

    an Argentinean species showed antifungal activity against

    opportunistic pathogenic fungi.

    Poke antiviral proteins are of great interest for their

    broad, potent antiviral (including Human Immunodeficiency

    Virus) and antifungal properties (P. Wang et al.

    1998). Pokeweed is a powerful immune stimulants, promoting

    T- and B-lymphocyte proliferation and increased immunoglobulin

    levels.

    Saponins found in P. americana and P. dodecandra are

    lethal to the molluscan intermediate host of schistosomiasis

    (J. M. Pezzuto et al. 1984).

     

    A study was carried out to ascertain anti-carcinogenic

    effects of poke root on breast cancer cells. Poke

    roots were freeze-dried and powdered. The powdered

    materials were extracted three times with methanol/

    water mixture and/or water. The extracts were administered

    at concentrations of 0 to 1 mg/mL into human

    breast (ATCC ZR-75-30) cell cultures maintained in

    RPMI medium supplemented with 10% FBS and

    cultured in the presence of a serial dilution of crude

    extracts for 24, 48, and 72 h.

    The anti-proliferative activity of crude extracts from

    poke root on cancer cells was measured using MTT

    assay. Methanol/water extracts of poke root significantly

    reduced breast cancer cells’ proliferation and growth

    at concentration of 0.6 mg/mL and above. The water

    extract of poke root showed less inhibitory effect on

    breast cancer cell growth. There is a need for detailed

    investigation of the mechanism of modulation of poke

    root extracts and based on that, a possible therapeutic

    agent can be visualized and is now being used in various Chemotherapy applications.

    Phytolacca IstockPoke weed Phytolacca Americana

    New research has revealed that a possible cure for

    Childhood Leukemia called [B43-PAP] is found in

    the common Pokeweed. Anti-B43-pokeweed antiviral

    protein, B43-PAP, PAP is a pokeweed toxin. The B43

    carries the weapon – the PAP – to the leukemia cells. In

    one study 15 out of 18 children who had participated

    had attained remission.

    The following is part of a report from Parker

    Hughes Institute:

    The two parts of this drug are the B43 antibody [or

    anti-CD19] and the pokeweed antiviral protein [PAP]

    immunotoxin, a natural product in the pokeweed plant.

    B43 is designed to recognize specific B-cell leukemia cells

    just as natural antibodies attack and recognize germs.

    When the antibody finds a leukemia cell, it attaches

    and B43 delivers the other part of the drug, PAP. Inside

    the cell, PAP is released by the antibody and inactivates

    the ribosomes that make the proteins the cell needs to

    survive. With the cell unable to produce proteins, the

    specific leukemia cell is killed. More than 100 patients

    have been treated with B43-PAP and shown only minimal

    side effects.

    Pokeweed antiviral protein shuts down the ribosomal

    “energy generators” in cells infected by HIV. Phytolacca

    mitogens stimulate the production of B and T cells by the

    immune system. They also, however, increase sensitivity to

    the lectins of foods. The triterpene saponins in pokeroot

    have been shown to counteract swelling and edema caused

    by acute allergic response.

    3

    Pokeroot is safe for poultices and external use. Poke leaf

    is edible when boiled twice. Consumption of raw poke

    leaves and root can cause gastroenteritis with intense

    vomiting and frothy diarrhea.

    Typical Preparations

    Usually used as a tincture in a dosage of one drop per

    day. Three dried pokeberries for one month swallowed

    whole without chewing followed by one dried berry daily

    for up to one year is safe. Do not overdose. Most often

    found in topical applications like creams, ointments,

    and oils. Pokeroot is for treatment, not prevention.

    Some take pokeroot tinctures for up to 2 weeks at a time to overcome

    the symptoms of colds, flu, sore throat, mastitis, or

    tonsillitis. Use 5 drops of tincture in 3/4 cup (60 ml) of

    warm water to soak a 5” x 5” cloth to treat skin inflamed

    by eczema or psoriasis up to 3 times a day for up to 2

    weeks. Ten drops of equal parts of the juice of ripe poke

    berries and alcohol may be given every thirty minutes in

    membranous and spasmodic croup with great success.

    Use of pokeroot to treat lymphedema, testicular

    Inflammation, or ovarian pain, or as an alterative for

    Cancer should be medically supervised.

    Precautions: When ingested, the roots, leaves, and

    fruits may poison animals, including Homo sapiens.

    Symptoms of poke poisoning include sweating, burning

    of the mouth and throat, severe gastritis, vomiting, bloody

    diarrhea, blurred vision, elevated white-blood-cell counts,

    and unconsciousness. If consumption is greater than 1/2

    ounce of the berries or root or 10 berries in an infant, coma

    and death by respiratory paralysis could occur. Safety has

    not been established for pregnant women, nursing mothers,

    or children under the age of 6. Do not use pokeroot if

    you have liver or kidney disease. “Accidental exposure to

    juices from Phytolacca Americana via ingestion, breaks in

    the skin, and the conjunctiva has brought about hematological

    changes in numerous people, including researchers

    studying this species” (G. K. Rogers 1985).

    Phytolacca berries Istock

    Pokeweed is most easily grown in a temperate climate

    such as that of eastern North America. The top dies down

    in winter. The young, asparagus-like shoots are formed

    in spring and can be grown from lifted roots dug in the

    winter. Pokeweed blooms in the warm weather from July

    to September. There is little cultivation of pokeweed in the

    United States. It grows wild rather extensively and mine is

    gathered from the wild. Pokeweed grows in rich pastures,

    waste places, gardens, open places in woodlands, and along

    fence rows. It grows on deep, rich, gravelly soils, limestone,

    and sandy hammock soils in Florida. It is a perennial herb,

    reproducing by seeds or from a very large taproot.

    You can’t buy Poke extracts in the store, as the FDA

    considers them too toxic for casual use by the general

    public, but you can learn how to use this medicine under

    the guidance of an experienced herbalist or naturopathic

    physician.

    SELECTED REFERENCES

    1. Barbieri L, Aron GM, Irvin JD, Stirpe F. Purification and partial

    characterization of another form of the antiviral protein from

    the seeds of Phytolacca americana L. (pokeweed). Biochem J.

    1982;203(1):55-9.

    2. Girbes T, Ferreras JM, Arias FJ, Stirpe F. Description, distribution,

    activity and phylogenetic relationship of ribosome inactivating

    proteins in plants, fungi and bacteria. Mini Rev Med Chem.

    2004;4(5):461-76.

    3. Bolognesi A, Tazzari PL, Olivieri F, Polito L, Falini B, Stirpe F.

    Induction of apoptosis by ribosome-inactivating proteins and

    related immunotoxins. Int J Cancer. 1996;68(3):349-55.

    4. Bonness MS, Ready MP, Irvin JD, Mabry TJ. Pokeweed antiviral

    protein inactivates pokeweed ribosomes; implications for the

    antiviral mechanism. Plant J. 1994;5(2):173-83.

    5. Terenzi A, Bolognesi A, Pasqualucci L, Flenghi L, Pileri S, Stein H,

    Kadin M, Bigerna B, Polito L, Tazzari PL, Martelli MF,

    Stirpe F, Falini B. Anti-CD30 (BER=H2) immunotoxins containing

    the type-1 ribosome-inactivating proteins momordin and PAP-S

    (pokeweed antiviral protein from seeds) display powerful antitumour

    activity against CD30+ tumour cells in vitro and in SCID

    mice. Br J Haematol. 1996;92(4):872-9.

    6. Bolognesi A, Polito L. Immunotoxins and other conjugates: preclinical

    studies. Mini Rev Med Chem. 2004; 4:563-83.

    7. Wiley RG, Lappi DA. Targeted toxins in pain. Adv Drug Deliv

    Rev. 2003;55(8):1043-54.

    8. Armesto, J. J., G. P. Cheplick, and M. J. McDonnell. 1983. Observations

    of the reproductive biology of Phytolacca americana (Phytolaccaceae).

    Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 110: 380-383. Caulkins, D.

    B. and R. Wyatt. 1990. Variation and taxonomy of Phytolacca

    americana and P. rigida in the southeastern United States

    9. Investigation of anti-carcinogenic activity of Poke root (Phytolacca

    Americana)

    GOKTEPE, B. Milford, and M. Ahmedna. North Carolina A&T

    State Univ.,

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